Donating Breastmilk

posted 3 years ago in Parenting
Post # 3
42157 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@harperlynn:  You might want to reconsider saving more of your own milk. You never know when you might be ill or your milk supply may decrease.

I don’t have a suggestion for you as far as donating milk as I have no idea where you live.

Post # 4
6633 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I don’t know of any places but as a mother who has used donated Breast milk from a milk bank I want to thank you for thinking of mothers who are in need of milk.  I couldn’t produce enough for my son while he was in the NCIU so we used donated milik

Post # 6
3618 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@harperlynn:  I think that is a beautiful idea 🙂 

However, make sure you keep your own safety and child in mind because you can’t help others when you can’t help yourself! I am not a monther and nor do I know whether I will ever be but to even consider this is very kind of you! 

Post # 8
42157 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@harperlynn:  If you just had your baby, the engorgement is normal, temporary and does not necessarily mean you are going to have an oversupply of milk. I think you may be jumping the gun a little.

La Leche has a great website with lots of information on breatsfeeding.

Post # 9
2884 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

your milk supply will adapt to your baby’s needs. if you pump a tiny bit to relieve discomfort but otherwise only pump/breastfeed as and when your baby is hungry…the supply will reduce. Your body is figuring out how much the new baby needs

Post # 10
509 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@harperlynn:  Ditto on what others said about waiting to see what your supply is like long term.  In the meantime, freeze it.

I had an oversupply with my daughter and at one point, had over 300 ounces in my freezer.  I also wanted to donate but found out that they didn’t need my milk as my daughter was not a preemie or anything “special” in which milk was in short demand.  Apparently your milk comes in very different depending on how many weeks your child is when you deliver.

But I kept asking the lady if she had any idea how I could donate my milk and it turned out that her daughter needed milk and couldn’t afford to buy from a milk bank.  So I donated all  my milk to her daughter.

Once you realize you have enough milk, call the milk banks back and ask if they personally know someone that needs milk or if they can get you in touch with a way to donate it privately.  I gave her all my milk for free…although they did pay for the dry ice, the ice chests, and the shipping costs.


Post # 11
1472 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I pumped a ton of extra and donated around 500 ounces over the first year of baby’s life (and I only ever pumped with a hand pump). I don’t have any suggestions if you don’t meet the donor requirements, though. Bummer.


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