Drinking and sushi ok? Hmmmmmm……..

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
3128 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2017

I have been sober for almost a year so alcohol doesn’t matter much to me but my coffee… yum. I am cutting back to abou 8oz of coffee a day but I still felt guilty. This article helps slightly.

Post # 4
Member
4218 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Meh. I will be taking advice from my OBGYN and doctor and from what I learned in University in nutrition and food sciences. Not from a magazine article.

I can live without wine, coffee and sushi. To me it’s just not worth the risk. 

Post # 5
Member
11772 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2013

This was up earlier this week. My opinion is that I would listen to her if she had a medical degree, or a degree in understanding and interpreting statistics, but she’s an economist.

My doctor (who is ULTRA lenient) has only forbade two things: food not cooked well ( so anything raw/undercooked), and alcohol.

I think I’m going to stick with his expert opinion!

Post # 6
Member
2884 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

i think its something that every woman has to decide for herself after looking at the available information thats out there. i havent personally given up caffeine – i follow the guidelines of up to 200mg/a day, generally a small coffee and/or a can of coke. i also dont think in the 2nd/3rd trimesters than a small glass of wine with a meal is dangerous for the baby occasionally (once a week or less).

 

Post # 7
Member
3677 posts
Sugar bee

@BrandNewBride:  My opinion is that I would listen to her if she had … a degree in understanding and interpreting statistics, but she’s an economist.

Except that an econ degree, for all intents and purposes, *IS* “a degree in understanding and interpreting statistics.” The same is true for virtually any research-based degree in the social sciences and the hard sciences. It isn’t only statisticians who possess expertise in stats. They just make it their primary focus (i.e. studying how statistical models work), while other types of research focus on applying statistics to other domains (such as econ or medicine).

I’m not saying you should start drinking and eating sushi based on her recommendation. I *am* saying it’s a mistake to discredit her analysis based solely on the fact that her degree is in econ, and to assume that because of that she doesn’t have the skills to understand research in other fields. There’s no reason to jump to the conclusion that a well-educated person can’t transfer skills and knowledge from one domain to another. On the contrary – it’s really important to apply knowledge and skills to other domains, and we can all learn a lot from looking at things from a different perspective (like, for instance, an economist’s perspective on pregnancy research). You don’t have to agree with her on every point – but you shouldn’t automatically disagree with her, either, just because you don’t think she has the right credentials.

Post # 8
Member
8706 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

As far as I’ve seen from the advances modern medicine have made, everything in moderation outside of the normal “Do not dos” (Smoking, heavy drinking, drug use, etc).

Not pregnant nor intending to be anytime soon, but I feel it’s up to a woman and her doctor to come to the conclusion what is safe for her and what isn’t.

Post # 9
Member
2243 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

17 weeks pregnant: eating sushi like it’s nobody’s business & not going to stop! I feel like most women who avoid it “because their doctor said so” are profoundly ill-informed on the level of risk. 

@KCKnd2:  You bring up an EXCELLENT point!

Post # 10
Member
11772 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2013

@KCKnd2:  Thank you for making a REALLY good point. I wasn’t aware of how econ degrees and understanding statistics were linked, aside from when the author mentioned it.

It is really good to have someone saying that we need to calm down as a collective society when it comes to pregnancy!

That being said, I’ve always been a pretty major proponent of listening to whatever the American Pediactrics Association tells me, due to my career in childcare.

Post # 11
Member
7654 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

In all honesty, I don’t like sushi and I can live without alcohol. I am going to take my doctor’s advice and say away from seafood, alcohol, soft cheeses (like feta) and undercooked and deli meats. However, in all honesty, come my second or third trimester, I may sneak a piece of feta spiunach pizza or a sandwich with some pastrami if I’m doing ok.

Post # 12
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@HappySky7:  +1! For nine months, I can give up anything. It is such a small price to pay and it could have lasting impacts on my child’s life. Not worth the risk, regardless of what new “research” suggests (it isn’t like the don’t change their minds every week anyway). It stands to reason that if something isn’t the best for us, it isn’t the best for our unborn babies either.

Post # 13
Member
5460 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I was very, very careful during the first trimester.  No lunch meat, no soft serve, very limited caffeine, no alcohol, , no undercooked meat, no medications, etc.

During the 2nd tri, I had my morning cup of coffee every day.  I heated lunch meat in the microwave, and I just kind of relaxed a little bit.

The 3rd tri I relaxed even a little more.  I had a few small sips of wine on a few occasions.  I indulged a craving for some fro-yo.  

It’s all about understanding what the risks are, and deciding for yourself what risks you are comfortable taking.

Post # 14
Member
4218 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@MrsPanda99:  Yes, really.  I am a total sushi addict. If I could have it every day I would. But I can live without it. If the baby doesn’t need it, then why not just leave it out? I gave up gluten, I gave up dairy, I have given up a lot of things perminantly. I’m a bug fan of being precautious whenever I can. I don’t need wine or sushi to live. I just can’t justify taking the risk. 

Post # 15
Member
1286 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@HappySky7:  Agreed!

I’m not saying that an economist can’t read and interpret the medical research, but I wouldn’t trust them to see the big picture and understand that genetics play a HUGE role in all of this, and that even randomized controlled large cohort studies have bias. I have a wonderful OB who keeps himself current on the literature. I know this because we often have discussions on what I should or should be avoiding/doing based on the current research so I know why. I am sad that not all doctors are like this, but that doesn’t mean we should be turning to economists for our medical advice.

Post # 16
Member
4218 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@KH:  Just because someone can analyze the data doesn’t mean they’re fit to interpret what those results mean from a medical standpoint. How the data literally translates to the real world seems skewed in this article. This person is not qualified to imply medical reccomendations because she/he can interpret some obscure studies. 

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