Ebola Outbreak Thoughts

posted 2 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 2
Member
9529 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

I dunno. I think the vaccines are still a ways out from mass prodcution. The reason this outbreak is so bad, is that it’s milder than previous ebola outbreaks so it isn’t killing people as quickly, so they’re infecting more people. I think people are getting better about recognizing symptoms and knowing not to touch bodies. But yeah, I still think it’s going to continue to get worse before it gets better. but I think they’ll get it under control. I don’t anticipate an apocalypse.

Post # 3
Member
10490 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

I’ve been following the outbreak for a while.  The mainstream media was super slow to catch on, I recall back in the winter/early spring thinking that it was close to being over.  More should have been done early on, especially considering the area – not just remote villages like many outbreaks in the past and areas that have never had Ebola before.

My thoughts on vaccines will get me into trouble here 🙂  I am pro-reasonably safe vaccines – the risk/benefit needs to be examined.  As someone who falls under contraindication for any vaccination with the information I currently have, and in the past when more precautions should have been followed in the past I have seen issues in the health field where too extreme of a stance is taken.  The health minister even comes out and says blah, blah, everyone over the age of x should get this vaccine which is NOT true.  Overall, I think vaccines are good, but there is so little information when the rare reaction does happen to be properly informed of risks.  The reaction/discrimination that exists when there are contraindications can be over the top at times.

When it comes to vaccines and Ebola, I think it’s way too early.  I think they should be fastracked considering the risk of the disease for the healthcare workers, body disposer, etc. who want it.  It’s still not ready for that unfortunately.  I think going in and doing mass vaccinations at this point would be the wrong way to go about it.  With all the distrust there already is, any issues that might come up with a new mass vaccine is likely to cause big political and medical system problems.  It might also cause the virus to spread further if people decide to take off due to distrust and panic.

Post # 5
Member
262 posts
Helper bee

I’m no expert whatsoever but this is an issue in certain parts of the world for a long time with no known cure or vaccine…. One British nurse working with infected patients contracts it and suddenly there’a a vaccine?!? Maybe I’ve got it all wrong and I’m being far too cynical…. Made me raise an eyebrow though.

Post # 7
Member
10490 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

WasMissNowMrs:  There have been a few vaccines being studied before the outbreak occured.  They haven’t been properly tested for safety & effectiveness in humans.  I’m not familiar with the British nurse, but maybe she agreed to test one out?  Unfortunately a handful of cases from foriegners isn’t going to give enough data.

Post # 9
Member
916 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

Why bring vaccines into this discussion?

I’m asking as a public health major.  The most promising advances in combatting ebola is with hydration… vaccine trials are underway, but will take a while to come to market.

Post # 14
Member
10490 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

RenoSweeney24:  I hadn’t heard of that, but it wouldn’t have been prioritized as high as it is now.  I had heard of one being studied before this outbreak hit.  If it had been considered as important a few years ago as it currently is, I think we could have been at a place where those involved in dealing with this would be recieving one of the vaccines.  There would probably also be a better supply of drugs ready to be tested for those who test positive.

Post # 15
Member
9529 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

Ah, if we’re talking about vaccines, in general, then I think we should be way more worried about measles! I’m fully vaccinated and I recommend that all my patients vaccinate their kids unless they have a counterindication. PP is right, there are definitely some people who have real, serious contraindications to getting vaccines and it’s actually those people who make it so important that everyone else get their vaccines. I actually find it a bit selfish to avoid vaccines without a counterindication. Now, an ebola vaccine is a different story because it hasn’t been studied enough to be used widely, at this point – we’ll have to wait and see. 

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