(Closed) Episiotomy fears

posted 5 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
2719 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

It scares me nervous too! My mom was cut with me (her first), and then tore with my brother, but it tore along the scar of my cut. Ughhh. Grosses me out! I think that’s what makes me most nervous!

Post # 4
Member
1026 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Yeah they both scare me too but everyone I know has told me that it doesn’t hurt nearly as bad as you’d think because you are so distracted by the whole birthing thing.  Kind of like getting the epidural.  It is nothing compared to the contractions and pushing.  I think the worst part is the recovery though.  Not looking forward to that part at all!!!

Post # 5
Member
5481 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Read Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth… she mentions some techniques she and her partners use.  One is massaging warm oil on the perineum, pushing until the baby crowns then slowing down the best you can so the baby doesn’t come out too quickly, and probably some other things I’ve forgotten.

Post # 6
Member
12259 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2013

I was TERRIFIED, so I talked to women at work about it (I work in childcare, so child birth stories are EXTREMELY accepted).

They said they didn’t even feel it! And they said that when they stitched everything back up, that they didn’t even care because they let you hold the baby while they do it.

Post # 7
Member
2426 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I haven’t had a baby yet, but my mom swears by episiotomies. She had a very generous one with me, and said it was only a couple pushes and I was out, she didn’t even feel the need for an epidural because it was so easy. With my sister she had a different doctor who didn’t think episiotomies were necessary, and even though she insisted she wanted one, he didn’t cut her enough and she had a much longer labor with tearing, and developed hemorrhoids from pushing so long/so hard. So with her experience, and the feeling that it’s easier for a clean incision to heal than a tear, I will be requesting a big episiotomy when I eventually give birth.

Post # 8
Member
2401 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Sunshine09:  

Does it hurt? I didn’t feel it at all!

Do they give you a local anesthetic first?  Yes, my doctor gave me a shot I later learned.

Can anyone rest my fears?  I would rather get cut then rip in my experience. They can give you a shot where they are about to cut but if you rip, you just rip. During the labor process and everything this will be such a small thing(: I didn’t even realize that she cut me till about a day after when I fell on the stitches on the toilet.

 

Don’t be worried(:

Post # 9
Member
4276 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I had a c-section but I will try to rest your fears. From what I read they actually do not like to do that anymore unless they have to because the complications can be worst then if you tear naturally.

Post # 10
Member
5557 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

We discussed this in my women childrennursing class, they at least felt it was worse.to cut than to tear, yes the edges of the cut are smoother, but from their experience as l&d nurses, people who started up with a small cut ended up with a large tear too. Its much easier to continue to tear once it is started. Now this was not fact or research based, just on what they had seen. But it makes sense to me.There are lots of techniques to try to reduce tearing that don’t involve a scaple. 

Post # 11
Member
4276 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@chasesgirl:  

Yeah, they explained that it is like cutting a piece of fabric and then pulling on the edges.

Post # 12
Member
1572 posts
Bumble bee

I’m also ridiculously scared of them! Thanks for the reassurance, ladies. I can’t believe that you can’t feel it! It just sounds so painful and I worry about the healing. But tearing sounds scary too! Luckily, on the reviews for my OB that I read before choosing one, a lady raved about how my OB used perineal massage and compresses to avoid tearing/episiotomy. 🙂

Post # 13
Member
207 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

I’m in a nurse practitioner program and I’ve heard the same thing said. When you cut, you go through muscle layers too, whereas when you ripped, it may have just been superficial on the skin. And once you make the cut, it can tear further (like a PP said, like fabric), so it is better for nature to do its thing. Supporting the perineum as the baby comes out, slowing down at the end so the baby doesn’t rocket out, laboring on your hands and knees all reduces tears. But like other posters said, I’ve heard that you don’t really notice the tear and cut till afterwards and they will numb it and stitch it right back up! Good luck and congrats 🙂

Post # 14
Member
6598 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

I am anatomist and I am actually lecturing on the perineum on Monday, and I am touching on episiotomies.

When you do an episiotomy you are cutting through many layers of connective tissue and muscle, when/if you tear you may not tear to the same extent. With median episiotomies, which are straight down toward the anus, there is usually additional tearing and a lot of associated complications. Tearing into the anus, pelvic prolapse etc. Some people are doing medial-lateral episiotomies instead, which are associated with less complications because it directs the tear away from the anus.

However, from what I know I would not let anyone cut my perineal muscles unless absolutely necessary!

Post # 15
Member
384 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

Tearing is particularly common in the States (if that’s where you live) because all women seem to be expected to give birth on their backs. This makes the baby come out too fast out of your control. A better way to give birth is on all fours. Do this and you are MUCH less likely to tear. You can see other better positions to give birth in right here  http://www.parenting.com/article/the-best-birth-positions

Episiotomies are also common because more women than they should get epidurals meaning they can’t push as effectively and the doctor has to cut the mother in order to get the baby out. If you can manage without an epidural, you definitely should. Gas and air takes off the edge very effectively without any nasty consequences.

In terms of how much either hurts, I really can’t say not having had eithier one. They do tend to give you a local anesthetic  beforehand if you need one though.

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