Ethical Sourcing, Moissanite and Diamonds

posted 3 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
3570 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I know several people with beautiful rings from Blue Nile.

Post # 4
Member
1599 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@Korenne:  BlueNile has the same “ethical sourcing” rules as any other major jewelry retailer- they abide by the Kimberley Act as basically every other distributor does.  There is absolutely no way to verify the “nature” of the sourcing of your stones beyond saying that they are “Kimberley Certified” which means next to nothing. Additionally, the Kimberely Act is meant to only prevent “conflict diamonds” (that is, diamonds that are used as trade in civil wars) and does NOT speak to the conditions within the mines or in the surrounding environments. Additionally, its nearly impossible to track the origin of a specific stone (no matter what your cert says.)

Canadian Diamonds are free of the “blood” of african civil wars, however the recent surge in demand is wreaking havoc on the landscape in canada and there are grave concerns about the environmental impact of large-scale mining, which is beginning to take place. Russian diamonds prove similar issues with demolishing the surrounding ecosystems.

Moisannite is obviously conflict-free, but is not a diamond.

There is basically no GOOD, morally “clean” way to get a real diamond that is not lab-created.

Post # 6
Member
1599 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@Korenne:  5 years in the diamond industry taught me way more than I ever wanted to know 😉

Post # 7
Member
164 posts
Blushing bee

@Korenne:  All companies have the same ethical sourcing policies, so Blue Nile/Brilliant Earth isn’t special. In the US, it’s illegal for any jewelry store to use a vendor that doesn’t adhere to the Kimberley Process. You may come across EGL certifications stating that the diamond is conflict-free, which is very controversial, since unless an EGL employee physically follows that specific diamond through the mining and cutting process, they can’t objectively certify it ‘conflict free’

That being said, I think every precious metal/gemstone used in rings have environmental issues, so it’s almost impossible to avoid it all. I’d imagine mining gold and platinum causes environmental damage too. Lab created diamonds are a ‘clean’ way to go, but that depends on if you’re okay with that.

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