Ever had to Fire someone?

posted 4 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@cora_123:  Yes, I have. The best advice I can give you is to not let emotions get in the way (I understand that may be easier said than done). I am a different person at work than I am at home, and the needs of the business come first. You need to be logical, not emotional. It is her responsibility to take care of her family, and no one keeps a job because someone pities them (not in the economy! There are lots of hard workers who need jobs). If she cared about her job and making money for her family, she would care about performing at work (I am assuming you’ve had the necessary coaching sessions and performance plan implementation with her).

I find that female managers tend to let emotions rule decisions, at least moreso than male counterparts. Someone is either performing or not. Doing what’s best for the business and shareholders is a black and white issue.  

Post # 4
Member
974 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@cora_123:  First of all, have you already warned her? You need to follow whatever disciplinary handbook she was most recently given and signed, to protect your company from liability should she choose to sue or seek revenge. Most company policies are one/two verbal or written warnings (preferably written to prove that they understand) before termination, unless they commit a grave offense (which has pretty strict definitions.)

Once all of your bases are covered I say rip the bandaid off. Typically what I would do is outline my reasons for terminating the employee, citing past warnings and reoccurring/escalating issues in no uncertain terms. Do it objectively, from a logical standpoint, with a calm voice and understand that she may become upset. Do not take the bait. She may try to make it personal. Do not take the bait. If she becomes unable to have a civil and logical conversation with you about the matter, end the conversation and let her know how long she has to gather her things before you expect her off of company property, and when she can expect to receive her last payment.

I’m rooting for you! 😀

Post # 7
Member
9137 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@cora_123:  Talk to your manager and HR.  They can guide you on what needs to be done.  As for worrying about her being a single mom, that’s her problem.  She is responsible for being a good employee and keeping her job.  You can’t get attached to employees you manage because you might have to fire them for being poor employees or due to budget/personnel cuts.

Post # 8
Member
812 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2013 - Mansion House at the MD Zoo

I’m with PPs assuming you’ve followed all the proper procedures and such. If so, she should have some warning. IE a recent problem on top of being warned repeatedly that this behavior cannot continue. anyway, just stay calm. Say something like, ‘(company name) has determined that, due to continued performance issues that have not been rectified, we are unable to continue your employment at this time. As of today you are being terminated. Please turn in your badge/keys/whatever and your final check will be mailed to you (or whatever your company does). Then just tell her she should address any further questions to HR. (or put them in writing to you so you don’t say something you shouldn’t in the moment) If she flips out, tell her that the decision is final and you will ask her to leave the building. If she cannot do that call security/911. In my experience people rarely get angry, they’re usually just upset/sad/quiet/whatever.

 

Whatever you do I would recommend not getting into a long conversation/negotiation with her about why and what she can do differently. Just say that teh time for her performance problems to be corrected has already passed and there has been no change, so we (alwys say we, not I) are unable to continue your employment.

 

You got this! I’ve fired several people and I’m always surprised that it’s easier than I would expect. Let us know how it goes.

Post # 10
Member
812 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2013 - Mansion House at the MD Zoo

@cora_123:  I work for a small-medium size non-profit. We’re also full of social workers and similar and super touchy-feely and warm and fuzzy. I feel your pain. 🙂 But unfortunately your job as a manager is to do what’s best for the agency and your team, not to protect people from themselves. You’ve given her ample warnings, so she probably knows something’s going to happen. It sucks, a lot. The easiest thing to do is to stick to a script in your head, and just keep repeating it. Don’t drag it out, and don’t get into conversations about why and how and such. It should only take 5 or 10 minutes. Good luck!

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