Food Allergies and Caterers

posted 3 years ago in Food
  • poll: What accommodations would you make for a guest with food allergies?
    None. If they don't like what I'm serving, they can take care of their own meal. : (0 votes)
    If we can tweak a dish pretty easily, I'll serve them something special. : (4 votes)
    19 %
    I would make sure there was a meal they could eat. : (17 votes)
    81 %
  • Post # 2
    Member
    3047 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    For me it was really important that all my guests would not only have something to eat, but something they also enjoyed. We asked people to RSVP on our wedding website, and there they could also list dietary constraints. We ended up having to switch out two meals, one for a vegetarian guest and one for a guest that wouldn’t eat fish. We also had two guests with diabetes 2, but they both told me that I wouldn’t have to make any specific changes to their food.

    In your friends’ case, if the caterer doesn’t feel comfortable arranging her food, perhaps you can bring it in from another place that you know have provided your friend with safe food in the past?

    Post # 3
    Member
    1491 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    I have severe food allergies but wouldn’t expect a bride to have her caterer prepare me a special dish/meal.  If I can’t eat something, I just won’t eat it and I’ll try to find something else I can eat.  

    It is a nice gesture to try to accomodate her, but sometimes you just can’t.  If you really want to, contact your caterer and discuss the food preparation options with her.  See if its even a possibility or if it will cause more problems or issues for you and the caterer in the long run.  Also, with a big event there is always the risk that someone will forget or slip up, and the food still won’t be prepared with your friend’s allergies in mind.  Heck, even my food at my wedding gave me a bad allergy reaction…and I had not a problem at the tasting, so I thought I was good to go!    We had to switch my original entree out for a large plate of the hors d’ouevres in order for me to eat something resembling a meal.  

    Post # 5
    Member
    720 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    Miss Clover:  We have picked 1 alternative plated meal to the plated meal we are serving. We asked about that when we went to our food tasting. The venue requires our numbers along with the dietary restrictions to make sure everyone can eat something. We aren’t catering to those who say “I don’t like that.” Just to allergies. My mother is serverely allergic to the smell of mushrooms so we made sure nothing would contain mushrooms through out the night which the venue was willing and able to work with us!

    Post # 6
    Member
    3047 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    Miss Clover: It’s unfortunate that your caterer is backing down on their word. However, I think I would feel safer just ordering her food from someone else that might not be so busy that night. When you’re trying to prepare a lot of food for a large group of people, it’s easy to mess up – which obviously isn’t allowed to happen in this case. 

    Post # 7
    Member
    248 posts
    Helper bee

    I have a son with gluten allergy so you can imagine that was a huge deal for me since we are paying for the wedding.They said they will accomodate any which way.My daughters sweet 16 venue not as easy  so i may have to bring something but even if you do accomidate you have to warn them there may be a cross contamination issue so they just need to be aware.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by  jenrebmol.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 6 months ago by  jenrebmol.
    Post # 8
    Member
    1067 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2014

    Miss Clover:  We have a few guests with allergies/dietary restrictions. 1 is allergic to seafood, 1 is diabetic, 1 is Muslim who can’t eat pork, 1 vegetarian, and 1 pescetarian. As much as we wanted to be as accommodating as possible, we didn’t want 5 people dictating our entire menu either, so we chose to do food stations.

    Thankfully our venue is equipped to prepare dishes for nearly any kind of dietary need, so if we were doing a plated meal, they had no problems preparing and substituting a special plate for these guests.  

    If it’s a popular caterer or one that is through a larger venue (like at a hotel), I think it’s perfectly reasonable to expect them to prepare special meals.  If it’s a smaller company or one that only specializes in certain types of meals, I wouldn’t expect it since they may not have the equipment or resources to do so.  In both cases, I would definitely ask and if they aren’t able to, I agree with eocenia‘s suggestion on bringing in a dish from somewhere else.

    Post # 9
    Member
    248 posts
    Helper bee

    also i know its not always avaliable to do at a party so I am usually prepared to bring something for him. You actually just reminded me to get a gluten free cake for the wedding so he can have cake at the wedding.

    Post # 10
    Member
    49 posts
    Newbee

     

    Miss Clover:  I have a severe allergy, and whenever I attend a wedding, I find out my table assignment during cocktail hour, then ask a waiter if I can speak to the catering manager. I introduce myself, tell them where I will be sitting, and tell them about my allergy, and tell them to please let me know if there is any food I should avoid. I introduce myself during cocktail hour so I don’t have to sit and not eat while they check on whether I can eat food that has just been served. Usually I can eat most of the food at the wedding – one time I couldn’t eat the main dish and they kindly brought me a vegetarian plate! I don’t expect the bride to go out of her way to accommodate me, although my close friends have (or have sent me emails ahead of time telling me which dishes I will need to avoid).

    Post # 11
    Member
    114 posts
    Blushing bee

    I used to work as the manager of a private rental business and what we did when we had big parties was just tweak one meal for each allergy. For example, if the customer ordered a main course of something like “pork loin with creamy mushroom sauce and mashed potatoes”, we would serve that for all the guests, but the vegetarian one would have a meat substitute (tzay, a soy-based meat substitute – it tastes way better than it sounds), the lactose intolerant ones with get the same sauce but with lactose-free milk, and so on. It made it easier to keep track, since it was basically the same dish. This worked really well for all our parties, except for once when someone had such bad allergies we had to prepare a whole separate plate in a seprate kitchen.

    Post # 13
    Member
    3707 posts
    Sugar bee

    I just had a situation, with my daughter’s bridal shower, where the contract specificaly stated “nut allergy among the guests!” Nothing had nuts. Nothing would have nuts, except for maybe the little sweets. I told the guest that and STILL she didn’t eat anything that was prepared. She may have had something off the cheese/craker/fruit station, but I don’t know? Lunch for her was 5 mimosas. Not kidding.  It’s not that I wanted to eat almonds on my fruit tarts, I went out of my way to make sure everything was safe for her, and she still refused to eat it. So good luck!

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