(Closed) Food Revolution

posted 8 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

We watched. Totally scary. I can’t believe how much opposition Jamie Oliver is getting from the adults! It’s worse than from the kids!!! Plus I’m glad he didn’t get upset at that one kid for having to be at football practice and coming to prep late. That would have set a horrible standard: Eat well but forget physical activity. I hope the show wakes up a few people.

Question though: Is it typical in the States for ALL kids to buy their lunches every day?! Growing up here in Canada, I brought my lunch to school with me nearly every day, and maybe bought it once a month. In elementary school we didn’t even have a cafeteria and once a month we had “hot dog day”. Are things so different now or is this a cultural difference? It just makes me wonder how many parents are out there that don’t know what their kids are eating every day and aren’t packing nutricious lunches/meal choices for them.

Post # 4
Member
5263 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

@bakerella – I always brought my lunch. Partially because I am a vegetarian, and there were no healthy alternatives for me. I was definitely in the minority. 

Everyone had to pay for their lunch if they bought it at school. There was a subsidized plan for low-income families, but no lunch was provided by the school. That’s how it was at all 7 schools I went to (my parents moved us around a lot.)

Post # 5
Hostess
18646 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

@bakerella: It really depends on the person.  My schools always had lunches available and you had a meal plan.  I think back in elementary school things were more healthy back then, we didn’t have chips and soda available until I was in high school.

Post # 6
Member
809 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@Bakerella – I brought my lunch too but I’m also Canadian. The show almost makes it seem that the lunch is provided by the school. It seems that way for sure for the elementary school too. They mentioned something about reimbursable lunches? Maybe I misheard. I’m not sure how it works. 

Love the show though. It’s so important to teach the kids especially so they have a basis to educate their own children on the importance of proper nutrition. Knowing what you’re putting in your body is so important!

Post # 7
Member
2397 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I was actually just watching a bit of this.

Definitely not all kids bought lunch in my elementary/middle/high schools.  I would pack lunch some days and buy other days.  A lot of people in my high school would just buy tater tots for lunch, and that’s it.  I’d always get a chicken patty and tater tots or pizza when I bought in middle school and high school.  Not healthy, whatsoever.

Post # 8
Member
2765 posts
Sugar bee

@bakerella – They don’t really go into this on the show, but Huntington is desperately poor so a lot of students qualify for free or discounted school lunches.

It’s not really a cultural difference – it’s just poverty!

Post # 10
Member
2006 posts
Buzzing bee

It was about 50/50 at my elementary school for those who bought/brought lunch. We would get a lunch menu at the beginning of the month. Some kids ate the cafeteria lunches every day, some never did. I know my mom let me pick out like 4 days a month where I was allowed to buy lunch (she knew how bad the food was for me), and the other days I bought.

In middle school a “fast-food” lunch cart was added. Everyday a different restraunt would bring in food for us to buy (Chik-fil-a Monday, taco bell Tuesday, dominoes Wednesday, etc.). The school still provided normal cafeteria lunches for those who had lunch tickets (government subsidized). In high school we had regular cafeteria lunches, and for those with cash we could purchase fast food from three different carts around campus. Soda wasn’t on campus until high school.

As Mr. Bee stated, I’m sure a lot of these families are lower-income and thus get free or reduced-price lunch and breakfast from the government. I know getting these free meals is a lot of help to these families because that is two less meals they have to worry about paying for.

I only watched the first episode of the show, which was like a 2 hour preview of what was coming up for the season. As someone who is strongly invested in children’s health and nutrition, it disgusted me.

Post # 12
Member
2765 posts
Sugar bee

Wait, so no more breakfast pizza? 🙂

Post # 13
Hostess
18646 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Depends on what is on your normal breakfast pizza, Mr. Bee!

Post # 14
Member
5263 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

@speechie – they give breakfast in many Chicago public schools, as well. Something crazy like 20% of our public school students qualify as homeless. (We studied that in my Social Work class, although homeless is defined in a kind of broad fashion.) 

Honestly, I have never seen Food Revolution but might have to watch it now! I think healthy eating is so important and I was disgusted by the food they served when I was in school. 

Post # 15
Member
5263 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

@Mr. Bee – how’s this for a breakfast pizza? 😉 Sorry, sorry, OT.

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