(Closed) Getting a Dog & Cat at the same time- advice?

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

My suggestion is to get both while they are quite young.

Post # 4
Member
429 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

This was on day 2 of our new kitten Hampton…already curled up with the dog! The dog was 3.5 yrs in this pic, and for the first day we kept them separate, but then the next day…welll…..you can see for yourself. These guys are best friends, brothers. The cat loves chasing the dogs tail, the he jumped on his head and chews on his ears, and the dog could care less. More times, the dog yelps because the cat plays too rough. Then we laugh as we say “Hampton, don’t beat up Buster” .

Post # 5
Member
5496 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2010

Totally ideal to get them both around the same time. We got both kittens, then got a puppy (this was five years ago before I met my hubby-my mom has all of them) about a week later. The kittens were scared (puppy will try to pounce and want to play!) but they came around some within just a few days. Within a few weeks they were best friends. But definately monitor/supervise for as long as you feel its necessary. Whenever the puppy was out of his crate, we always watched him and the two kitties closely! Good luck!

Post # 6
Member
429 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

The dog and cat try to eat each others food. We keep the cat food on the basement stairs since the dog is afriad of the basement. The cat will try to eat the dog food (and does) but the dog growls and he backs off. They share a water dish, and toys.

Post # 7
Member
3762 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

We have a family in our neighborhood that walks their dog and the cat follows (no leash).  Its SO funny.

I think if you do it from the start you will be fine.  I would be careful because puppies are really playful and you want to make sure they know how to play nicely with the cat.  You can also make sure to get a puppy that is at least 8 weeks old.  The longer they are with their litter mates the more they understand how to play properly.  It also makes potty training a lot easier.

Post # 8
Member
3176 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I think the safer options is to get them both at the same time when they are young. I have a still fairly young cat (only a year) and my friend came with her tiny dog to visit for a week, the two HATED each other. They would be in seperate rooms hissing or barking at through the walls! You never know how animals might react.

Post # 9
Member
5496 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2010

@mudrat Our kitties/dog are the same. We trained the pup to not go to the basement so our kitties litter box/food is on the landing half-way down the stairs. And our cats try to eat the dogs kibble too!

Post # 10
Member
74 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I’m going to jump on the bandwagon and say it is best to get them both while they are young at the same time. They are more likely to bond as family members and less likely to develop small animal aggression (dog) or fear of dogs (cat), if they grow up together. It will also give both animals an outlet for their energy and kinship that you can’t really provide. Everyone always says to get two kittens, but a puppy and a kitten work too 🙂

Not saying it’s foolproof, but in my experience has always resulted in some really amazing interspecies friendships 🙂

Post # 11
Member
1046 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

Getting them at the same time is a good idea, before either of them establish a territory. We got two cats (one adult, one kitten) in the same week and we kept the kitten in the bedroom for a couple of days. The cats started interacting through the door. Next, we switched their rooms so that they would get used to each others smells. I think we did that for another day or two. And then we let them interact, but with us present to stop any fights. I think giving them the adjustment period really helped. They never fought.

Post # 13
Member
1570 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 1996

Getting them both young is definitely a great way to help them develop a good relationship. Keep in mind, though, that as your puppy goes through his first year and steps into adolescence, his personality is going to develop and he’ll probably start harrassing the cat. This is going to have to be a part of his training; you’ll set boundaries for him just like you do in other aspects of his life, and you’ll train him to respect you and obey when you tell him to knock it off. Make sure both you and your husband are consistent in providing the growing puppy with structure and discipline when necessary.

Our cat was 6.5 years old when we got our puppy. The puppy, who is now a year old, really just loves to play with the cat as though he’s another dog. This happens to work out well for their personalities because our cat is huge, strong, and very assertive and confident. He doesn’t flinch when the dog lowers his jaws over his entire kitty head: he just kitty-growls at him and swats him a good one on the face. There are places where the cat can jump onto if he gets sick of wrestling with the dog, such as our couches, where the dog isn’t allowed to go and doesn’t try to follow. If you can get a male cat I’d recommend it, as they’re more likely to have that confidence, and not develop a fearful reaction and run away and hide from the dog.

Good luck!

Post # 14
Member
3762 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

In terms of feeding a friend of ours had one of these:

They actually had a built in desk and put this in front of the desk and made a little area where the cat could get to but the dog couldn’t and kept the litter box/cat food in there.  It always was nice that the cat could get away from the dog (they liked each other but you know).

This might be harder if you have a big cat and a little dog though. 

Post # 15
Member
2607 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

Getting them young is a good idea.  But I am surprised nobody suggested adopting a dog that is a little older but is known to get along with cats.  You can totally bypass the potty-training and teething stage puppies go through. 

We have fostered several dogs, and because we have cats, we can tell the rescue if the dog would be okay in a home with cats or not.  One of the dogs we fostered wanted nothing more than to play with the cats, but they didn’t feel the same!  One wanted to eat them, and my husband had to tackle him when he went after one of them, so he had to go to a home that didn’t have cats.  The one we ended up keeping is a bit of a pushover….he weighs 80 pounds and yet the cats boss him around.  LOL. 

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