God, this is like torture!

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
1103 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

Poor ittle guy!!!! 

Post # 4
Member
10384 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Oh, man. What a hard decision. No pet insurance, I take it?

I guess I would look at the best case scenario for each outcome quality-of-life wise for the cat. If he gets the MRI and it is a stroke or tumor, what is the eventual likely outcome for a senior cat? What would that do to you guys financially?

All you can do is find the best balance between what you guys can do financially and what will provide your poor kitty with the best quality of life for his remaining days.

(and definitely look into pet insurance for your next pet – we pay about $300/yr for our 9 year old tuxedo kitty. Only a $250 deductible – things like the MRI would be covered 80-100% after the deductible depending on whether it is deemed specialized care. We have Pet Plan)

Post # 5
Member
359 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I just wanted to say that I’m sorry your kitty is having trouble And I know how draining it can be to try and care for a sick pet. Just trust that you are doing the best that you can for him. 

Post # 6
Member
2299 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I am so sorry to hear about your kitty. I have no real advice for you; like a PP said, it has to be a realistic balance between finances and quality of life,  although making sure your pet isn’t suffering should really be your number one priority. Again,  so sorry 🙁 Sending positive thoughts your way. 

Post # 7
Member
2537 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

I am so sorry.  🙁  Is there anyway that an MRI can be done elsewhere/cheaper? Plus, won’t the MRI pull out the BBs?

Post # 8
Member
310 posts
Helper bee

I’m sorry you’re going through this, and I don’t intend to scare you more, but have you discussed with your vet about a possible seizure? Cats after a seizure can be very unstable, seem confused and disoriented, and can end up drooling a lot due to the convulsions. It’s common for seizures to happen due to other illnesses such as an infection, but can also be caused through epilepsy though you would’ve noticed that one sooner. Eliminating it as a possible cause is not cheap by any means, but I thought I would at least mention it. Your vet knows more about the situation than I do, so I would still listen to them. I hope you find out what’s going on and your little man gets better.

Post # 9
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

My family cat most likely had two strokes (I say most likely because we never did an MRI, our vet consulted with a neurologist and I also talked about her with a neurologist when I was in vet school and they both suspected a stroke).  

She let out a horrible yowl, and then wouldn’t stop circling.  She was also blind in one eye and had reduced reflexes in her legs.  When I took her to the vet she had a new heart murmur and high blood pressure, so we figured she most likely had a stroke due to a blood clot from her heart disease.  We started her on meds for her heart and she slowly over 4 months returned to normal.  Her sight in the one eye came back in only a few days.

She did have a second stroke 7 months after the first one and didn’t really improve that time.  She was 19 years old but she was still a happy cat her last few months after the second stroke.

Post # 10
Member
518 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I am so sorry about your sweet kitty.  This is such a hard decision you have to make.  I don’t have any words of advice beyond what the other posters suggested about balancing finances with quality of life.  I will be thinking about you…((hugs))

Post # 11
Member
518 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I am so sorry about your sweet kitty.  This is such a hard decision you have to make.  I don’t have any words of advice beyond what the other posters suggested about balancing finances with quality of life.  I will be thinking about you…((hugs))

Post # 13
Member
2992 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

See what the morning brings. I have had almost 40 cats over my lifetime (10 now) and I have walked this path too many times. For me, it is a definite quality of life thing. If there is definite hope, I will move heaven and hell for my kitties. If the prognosis is poor,  I do  must be done. I owe them that much for all the love they give.

Post # 14
Member
181 posts
Blushing bee

@Baimee:  

Awww, im sorry about your kitty. I worked as a vet tech for many years before i switched to people nursing, and if i were you and this was my kitty,  i would treat him with meds to rule out a infection or virus and see if he imoroves at all. If it is a stroke it may start improving withim a few days. 

Here are my thoughts: Even If you do the Mri and find out it is a tumor, i dont think it would be best to operate. On top of the 3500 mri you woukd need to pay a neurosurgeon thousands  to operate, and operations do not always have good outcomes. I dont know if it would be worth it to put  your senior kitty through the pain, trauma, and recovery of a major surgery. Even if the surgery would cure him, how long does he even have to live after that? 

I am a strong believer that quality is better than quantity. I wouldnt keep my cat alive is it is not enjoying life. When i worked at a animal hoosital we would usually tell people if their pet i not eating or drinking, or does not enjoy being pet anymore it may be time to let him go, but only you can make that decision. Some people like to do everything possible, others will do reasonable attempts at treatment and dont go all out. Its your cat and you know him best. You are the only one who will know what level of diagnostics and treatment options feel right to you.  You are the only one who can make this decision. 

I wish you the best. Feel free to pm me if you need to talk or have any questions.

Post # 15
Member
136 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

In case this hasn’t been mentioned yet, the “M” in MRI is a magnet.  By your own admission, the cat had a hard life before you got him and that he’s basically full of metal.

DO NOT put your kitty in a machine with a large, powerful magnet.  You’ll save money and your cat will be better for it regardless of what’s going on.  Sit it out.  Wait the couple of weeks for results without an MRI if it comes to it.

If your vet is unaware of the BBs, tell them about the BBs.  If your vet IS aware of the BBs, start questioning their ability, because they’ve suggested putting a living being with metal embedded in him into a magent.  Seriously.

If a viable treatment option is found and it’s costly, ask about payment plans.

I hope everything turns out for the best.

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