Greek wedding

posted 3 years ago in Bridesmaids
Post # 3
Member
81 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@kittwn:  Hello, I’m from the states but I am Greek Orthodox.  The wedding is August 30th.  Is your family from Crete?  Mines from Kastoria.  Planning has been crazy and planning has come to a haault because the church might go under construction and I might have to find another Orthodox church?  How’s your planning going?

Post # 5
Member
81 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@kittwn:   Wow a band and a dj, very nice!  My situation has become very irritarting because the priest forgot about our wedding when he planned the remodleing.  On top of that even though there is a Russian Church, Assyrian Church, and a Slavic Church in my area, I would have to get permission from the bishop and the the other churches priests to get married there.  While Im sure I could get an okay from one of the Churches Im nervous that I wont get permission from bishop.  (I said a while back to his face he was money hungry and was letting go of a really good priest.  So I’m hoping the bishop does not remember me)  If I don’t get permission from the bishop then I will still get married in another Orthodox church.  If there is no construction and I do get married in the Greek Church it will be in half ancient Greek and half in English.  If I get married in another Orthodox churchc it will most likely be all English.  To be honset though not many people (well at least in the states) understand the ancient Greeek.  It is just nice to hear what the service would have been like 2 thousand years ago.  Only I am Greek and it is interesting to see my fiance learn everything the Greek culture entails.  Have you learned how to do some of the dances yet.  I’m still teaching my fiance how to do some the basic ones.  🙂

 

Post # 6
Member
249 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@kittwn:  I am having a big fat Greek wedding in a Greek orthodox church in Toronto, Canada. The ceremony will be in an old Greek dialect, not sure if it is ancient Greek or not. I am keeping all of the traditions. We’re also half Macedonian so we will be having a pig dance at our reception. The fact that you’re having a band is amazing! Having a band is 1000000% better than having a DJ playing the Greek music. I am having a band too! Happy planning!

Post # 7
Member
249 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@kermitandpiggy:  Be careful about marrying in a church other than a Greek Orthodox church. Our koumbari got married in a Catholic church (the koumbara is a Catholic school teacher and she had to get married in a Catholic church otherwise she could lose her job)

When we booked the church they asked for the marriage certificate of our koumbari and they saw that it was a Catholic church. They refused to marry us because they said that our koumbaro has denounced his faith by getting married in a Catholic church. They said that if we wanted them to be our koumbari, they had to get re-married in the Greek Orthodox Church. It is pretty friggen ridiculous. Needless to say, they did it and we paid for it.

What Im getting at is, if someone asks you to be their koumbari and you got married outside the Greek Orthodox Church, you will have problems. Something to keep in mind for the future 🙂

Post # 8
Member
81 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@MsBark:  I’m Greek Macedonian and have family in the Toronto as well, was up there for a wedding once too.  I do not know if there is more than one church in Toronto, but it is a pretty church the one I went to in Toronto.  I do not know about the Russian Orthodox Church but I know at the Assyrian Orthodox Church and at the Slavic Orthodox Church, if we get married there then it will be recongonzied by the Greek Orthodox Church.  My brother is our Koumbro and he is in good standing with the Greek Orthodox Church, so he would still be able to be our Koumbro in the Assyrain and Slavic church.  I would prefer to get married in my Church becasuse I want the cermony half in Greek but they were talking about switching to all English anways in the near future so even that would be a mute point. I would prefer to be married in the Greek church (or approved by the Bishop to get married in another Orthodox Church) because then it would always be on record it was approved by the Greek Church.  Where as if I get married in an other Orthodox church and it was not approved by the Greek bishop it will always say in my marriage record I got married in another type of Orthodox church.  My marriage would be valid in the Greek church though, although the bishop wouldnt like it, and we would have no problem in the future baptising our children in the Greek Orthodox church.  I agree with you though and I do think its silly some of the rules they have.  My aunt and Greek uncle got married by the justice of the peace.  My aunt after seeing her children baptised in the Greek Church decided to convert.  After she converted they asked to see her marriage licenses.  They told her untill she got her marriage blessed in the Orthodox Church she would not be Orthodox.  If she had converted before she got married then she would be Orthodox.  To this day, even though she was Chrismated, she is not really Orthodox.

 

Post # 11
Member
1400 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I was raised Greek Orthodox,  but I no longer consider myself Christian,  and wouldn’t feel comfortable having such a religious ceremony. Also I want my wedding ceremony to include vows. It works out for me that FI is Jewish, and though in a perfect world my family would like me to get married in the church, no one has asked him about getting baptised, and they’re letting us do our thing 🙂

So we’re having a secular ceremony, but I really want to incorporate a bit of my culture via stefana. I’ve never heard of anyone else doing this outside an Orthodox ceremony, but I love the symbolism of being king & queen of our own new “race,” so we and our officiant are going to figure it out.

It was my understanding that Greek Orthodox churches use Liturgical Greek, which is in between Ancient and Modern. The church I grew up going to, in California, is pretty liberal I suppose, they’re willing to do a ceremony fully in English if you like, and no one has ever told my dad (I’m a quarter Greek but was raised like half) that he’s not really Orthodox because he chose to get Chrismated after marriage.

But anyways,  Greek Orthodox churches tend to be gorgeous, so there’s that 🙂

Post # 12
Member
249 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@kittwn:  make sure you ask the preist if its okay! you dont want any last minute issues!!

A pig dance is a macedonian tradition. Men dance around with a whole roasted pig and the koumbaro throws money on the pig, to “pay” for everyones meal. Back home the tradition is that the wedding eats the pig. Now we just serve it with the desert bar as not a lot of people like roasted pig.  

Post # 15
Member
179 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

Hello ladies and congratulations on your upcoming weddings.  I’m Greek and Greek Orthodox, have been married before (in GO Church) and getting married again in church to a Greek this time around – actually getting married in Greece.  If you have any questions I would be happy to answer them if I can.

First off… the ceremony is Orthodox, Greek is the language.  So you can have a Russian Orthodox wedding or Serian Orthodox wedding – it’s all Orthodox and basically the same. The priest says everything at weddings (as well as other sacramental services) three times (the trinity) in the USA it’s pretty standard practice to speak it twice in Greek & once in English. The service is long and most couples have a program printed explaining the different parts of the marriage sacrament, it’s very symbolic (& ancient) but your guests will enjoy it more if they can follow along and understand it.

Either the bride or groom needs to be baptised or crismated orthodox & koumbaro (bestman) and in good standing with the church in order to be married “in the church” – but both must be baptised or crismated christian, they will not marry orthodox christian to non-christian.

As long as a priest gives you the “okay” the orthodox ceremony can be preformed anywhere, but there has to be an “alter” (table). My fiance’s first marriage was in North Carolina in his small town in a methodist church with an orthodox priest (orth. wedding) to a baptist woman. I’ve been to a Greek Orth. wedding on the beach & at a golf country club. 

If you get married by the court or in another christian religion, you will need to have your marriage “blessed” by the priest in order to receive sacraments – this includes baptising your children or being a koumbaro. The blessing is really the whole orthodox ceremony, but it’s  normally small & not formal – most are done after church.

Didn’t mean to be on a soapbox, bu hope this eases some of you.

 

Post # 16
Member
81 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

 

@ApollosAgapi:  Thanks for the reassurance and congrats on your wedding.  The only time I have seen a wedding outside of the church was during our festival and that had to be apporoved by the bishop.  The priest said he was not sure if the bishop would even allow it and was surprised that the bishop said yes but only because a lot of the parish would be down at the festival helping and not at the church.  That is cool that your priests/bishops are more flexible.   

Leave a comment


Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Find Amazing Vendors