H was fired/quit

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 4
Member
7654 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

@tmsing:  First, he shouldn’t be taking the co-workers word for it. DH should be showing up for work just like he normally would and let them deal with it because honestly if he fails to show up, they are probably just going to “fire” him for not showing up to work. If no one of higher authority has called him, I would assume that is wrongful termination. I think that is the word I am looking for?

They cannot close his departure without giving him some sort of exit interview or explaining why he lost his job. I think he could take that to court honestly.

[Edit]: When I worked retail, if they were fired they had to sign a release that they understood their termination. That was the only way their termination was legal, so there is either a hole in your DH’s story or you have case you could make against this company.

Post # 5
Member
3570 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I think he risks losing a lot of important benefits if he does not continue to show up.

Post # 6
Member
10219 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

@megz06: –> 100% this

Weird story… you don’t take anyone’s word for what is going on in your career other than those who actually hired you… they are the folks who do the firing.

Until then you have a “contract” to appear.  By not appearing at work, you break yours side of the agreement, and THAT ACTION could lead to dismissal (and it wouldn’t be wrongful dismissal)

Work is like life, sometimes there is drama, hurt feelings, and gossip (not to mention back-stabbing)

I mean, I’ve seen circumstances where one employee has tricked another by lies and deceit so as to get another fired, or move into their job.

Not saying that is what is going on here… but seriously, you don’t owe any allegiances to a co-worker ever

(Which is why the strictest forms of Traditional Etiquette says one shouldn’t mix Work & Personal Life… ever)

((HUGS)) to you guys… certainly hope you can work all this out in light of the fact that there is already so much going on in your lives

Hope this helps,

 

Post # 7
Member
968 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Why would he just stop showing up at work without being told he is terminated? That doesn’t make any sense.

Post # 9
Member
11668 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

Sorry but I wouldn’t be taking someone else’s word (except my bosses) that I was fired.  He should have gone to work today and talked to his boss.  If I were him, I would have much rather resigned than been fired.

 

 

 

Post # 10
Member
7654 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

@tmsing:  I honestly think, ignoring his e-mail or not, he needs to deal with this like a mature adult. He still doesn’t know why he was “fired”, and honestly him not showing up today isn’t going to look so good for him in the end, even if he did tell 2 coworkers. Your DH, despite the hostile work environment, went about this very improperly. If he is worried about his safety, he is more than welcome to take someone with him, but he does need to man up and talk to his boss. I undertsna davoiding confrontation, but you can’t just do that in your job. It makes you look very unprofessional.

This is going to become a very sticky situation for you guys. If your DH is ok with this situation then by all menas he can stay home and not show up for work, but honestly if you expect some compensation or anything, this is going to get very sticky.

I honestly think his benefits are in danger here because of the lack of professionalism on both parts, but I think it will come down to your husband not showing up for work.

Post # 13
Member
11731 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

Not going in to face the situation is absolutely the wrong choice to take.  He basically just didn’t show up today because he didn’t want to deal with an awkward situation?  Not showing up for work without reporting in to your supervisor is grounds for termination in my office.  That will also hurt any chance of making a wrongful termination claim, FYI.

ETA: I’ve never had to sign a “notice of termination” when leaving a job.  (I’ve never been fired; is it only when they let you go?)  I have had to hand in a written letter giving my two weeks notice, but nothing more than that for my employer.

Post # 14
Member
10219 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

@abbie017:  —> This

Not to mention it “burns a bridge” which never good when job hunting, which is what the OP has now stated in an UPDATE (reply # 10 to myself) has said.

He cannot go on a Job Interview and have “a gap” in his employement history, especially so if the gap is long or recent without some sort of explanation.

And as the Interview process narrows down… the Potential Employer may very well call the recent Employer to get a feel for a bit on the Employees background…

A curt “He doesn’t work here any more” or “We let him go” from HR is going to damage his prospects in this tight economic looking for work scenario

What he’s done is very very immature.  There comes a time in life you have to suck it up… or at least be smart enough to weigh and understand the consequences of your behaviour

I get that the guy is under a lot stress lately (ill family member)

BUT closing down, or being angry, won’t achieve a desired result… it will just make the situation all the worse IMO

 

Post # 16
Member
11731 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@tmsing:  I’m sorry he went through all of that terrible stuff – I really am.  But he took on the responsibility of an adult job and he needs to act like an adult and face his problems.  If his past is getting in the way of him maintaining employment, perhaps he should be looking into a leave of absence with  some therapy to help him adjust better?

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