Handwritten invitation wording

posted 3 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
258 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@Notcool:  I think I would change the first line to say something like “We are getting married on Saturday the 26th of April and we would be so honored if you could come.” What you currently have written sounds kind of stiff, as if you don’t think there are very many people who are worthy to be at your wedding.  Maybe I’m just being sensitive?  

And then the end that says “please let us know if you will be present” is kind of dry too.   Maybe something like “Please let us know if you can make it, we really hope that you can celebrate our special day with us, Love Amy and Michael”. 

Again, maybe I’m just being sensitive.  Good luck and congratulations!

Post # 4
Member
6510 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

@Mewcakes:  I don’t think you’re being sensitive- I think you made good suggestions.

I find the line “one of the few special people” to be stiff and for some reason I don’t really like it.

Post # 5
Member
1649 posts
Bumble bee

@Notcool:  Hello “Notcool”: welcome to the Bee and the etiquette board. Allow me to disagree with your user name. You are too cool: in fact you are the first bride I have encountered in years who,  in planning to have an informal wedding, is actually sending out proper informal invitations worded naturally as a social note. I could kiss you, if not for my own pompous dignity and the fact that there is an internet in the way.

On to the etiquette issues:

In a formal invitation, you invite people by the names you would use when speaking to them formally: to whit, their titles and surnames. In an informal invitation, you invite people by the names you would use when speaking to them informally: normally by their given names or by their family nick-names such as “Auntie Vee” or “Grandma” (or “Mum” and “Dad”.)

In a formal invitation and on the outer envelope, the gentleman’s name goes first: “Mr Jones and Ms Smith” — think of it as him stepping forward to protect his lady. On an informal note, the lady’s name goes first: “Dear Mary and Bill” —  because she is assumed to be in safe, friendly company with no need of his protection.

Technically, by the strictest etiquette you should be sending out social notes in your own name only until after you are married: you would say “Michael and I are getting married…” and sign it simply “Love, Amy”. I mention this for completeness, not because I expect any bride to actually respect such an old-fashioned nicety. But then, I don’t expect them to recognized the propriety of a properly informal social note, either, and you already proved yourself exceptional by doing just that. So take it for whatever it’s worth to you.

With respect to grammar, spelling, punctuation and captialization: “Twenty Sixth” should be “twenty-sixth” and “ten thirty” should be “ten-thirty” or “half past ten” (or “half after ten” which some sticklers — not I — will tell you is more proper than “half past”.)

Post # 7
Member
1649 posts
Bumble bee

@Notcool:  I prefer the second wording: it sounds more natural (and I understand completely about sending the invitation in both your names.)

Post # 8
Member
258 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@Notcool:  I also like the second one better.  I tend to be really flowery with my writing and often over-use exclaimation marks.  A lot.  Like…they’re everywhere.  I’m sure I sound like I’m super amped in EVERY letter I write. 

 

Love the hand-written touch, I think your guests will really appreciate that.

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