Has anyone been an egg donor or had experience with IVF?

posted 3 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Member
2190 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

I don’t have any experience, but think that it is an absolutely wonderful thing that you are thinking of doing. 🙂 I hope there are others out there who can answer your questions for you!

Post # 4
Member
1178 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@Aquaria:  I don’t have any experience or advice. Just wanted to say I think it’s an amazing thing just to consider, go you!

Post # 5
Member
169 posts
Blushing bee

@Aquaria:  I was an egg donor and did the maximum donation cycles allowed by the FDA, 6, and it was such an incredible journey!  It takes a lot of dedication to be an egg donor in my opinion, but my clinic became like a second home to me and my doctors and nurses were like family.

Being an egg donor is a committment.  The injections are not bad at all…the needles are so small I rarely even felt them go in.  Every clinic is different, but I had to draw up all my own meds and follow directions very well.  My first cycle I developed OHSS (ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome) so there are risks involved, but if you put your trust in your doctors and nurses they will take the best care of you and educate you along the way.

It’s been 6 months since my last cycle and I just got married; we’re hoping to start our own family very soon! The experience of being an egg donor was great to me. I started doing it for noble reasons, working in the healthcare field myself I’m always looking for a way to help. The monetary compensation was great too as you put a lot of time and effort into the cycles while taking your own risks.

Post # 6
Member
868 posts
Busy bee

@Aquaria:  I have not been an egg donor but have researched it. apparently the drugs and procedure are quite invasive, and the procedure does slightly effect your own chances of becoming pregnant. ( if any bees are nurses here, feel free to correct me if I’m wrong!) I called around and even put a ad up here in Canada but i never did receive any responses. it was weird even fertility clinics here in Canada did not have any information on how I could donate my eggs. 

Post # 8
cherrypieBee
1059 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2008 - A tiny town just outside of Glacier National Park

I went all the way through the application process before starting a job that didn’t jive with the donation hormones and appointment schedule. I always really wanted to!

It’s certainly an inconvenience to say the least — you have to be on their hormone schedule, can’t be on birth control (clearly) and must abstain from sex for periods of time. At the worst, you can develop some problems that can cause illness and discomfort (OHSS is one of them) or have painful harvests.

Compensation in my area (Seattle) was about $5000 in 2005.

Post # 9
Member
169 posts
Blushing bee

@Peachytalk:  Thanks! 

In vitro fertilization with the use of a donor egg was only first successfully accomplished in 1984 and there hasn’t been a lot of studies on how donating effects a womans chances of becoming pregnant in the future.  Before I donated I asked a lot of questions on that topic and only proceeded when I felt confident I wasn’t harming my own chances of starting a family of my own when I was ready.  In my own research I found a lot of donors that had gone on to successfully conceive their own babies and I wasn’t finding donors who had problems conceiving unless it was for a completely unrelated issue.  I guess that is all I needed to hear. 

I would not call donating eggs invasive from my experience; you give yourself injections in your stomach and receive light anesthesia for a 20 minute outpatient procedure that you recover from in a day.  The part that takes dedication are the vaginal ultrasounds and blood draws every 48 or sometimes 24 hours during a cycle to check your progress.  Besides developing OHSS in one of my cycles I experienced some discomfort each cycle as my retrieval drew closer because my ovaries, typically the size of an almond, would grow to the size of grapefruits!  My ovaries would fill up so much of my abdominal cavity it would actually push my other organs out of the way…not painful, just some discomfort.

There are definitely risks involved and it can be an inconvenience, but what an incredible gift you are giving someone! 

Post # 10
Member
291 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

What a great thread! I really applaud those who have done this as it really is such a gift to give to those who cannot conceive on their own. I have considered doing this many times but I really cannot get past the fact that my genetic material would be out there creating a child that I would never see. I’m just curious, did that bother you when you were looking at donating, @lastlastfirst?

Post # 11
Member
3210 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

I’m in the process of screening for egg donation now! I passed the first round of screening, and I have the next round this week. My clinic said only 1 in 10 women actually passes all of the screenings, so I don’t have my hopes TOO high, but I would very much like to donate.

The first screening was for hormone levels and an ovary exam, among other things–that was the one I was most worried about, so I am glad I passed! Next up will be genetic screening, infectious diseases, and a drug test. I think it’s kind of cool that I get to find out if I’m a carrier for any troublesome genetic traits for free!

 

Post # 12
Member
169 posts
Blushing bee

@LovelyLee:  To be an anonymous egg donor you can’t really think of it that way. To me, I donated tissue that I wasn’t using myself those cycles. Yes, I understand there may be babies born that will have 50% of my genetic makeup, but that doesn’t change the fact that they are by no means my children since donating an egg is only 50% of the equation and their parents are who raised you, not who’s dna you are made up from. Part of the screening process to become an egg donor was a full psychological exam and in sitting down with a psychologist this is one of their biggest areas they touch on. Since the program I went through was anonymous they wanted to be sure that all donors do not view donating eggs as giving someone a baby and to make sure you understand that you’ll never have any rights. I admittedly am curious what they look like, etc. and I think I’d be a cold person if I wasn’t. I’m looking forward to starting my own family with my now husband and seeing what our children look like 🙂

Post # 13
Member
169 posts
Blushing bee

@howsweetitis:  Good for you! I am so happy that I got genetic testing in my screening process and was able to find out that I am not a carrier of anything my family history may be prone to. That kind of testing is not inexpensive and it’s great information for my now husband and I to know. Good luck!

Post # 14
Member
291 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

@lastlastfirst:  Very true! That’s a really good way to think about it!

Post # 15
cherrypieBee
1059 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2008 - A tiny town just outside of Glacier National Park

I always found the idea that I would have a half-child out there to be really, really cool. Not in the sense that I would consider myself a parent, or that I’d want to have any rights at all, but that I felt on a very biological level that I’d succeeded in further diversifying my genes. That seemed pretty nifty to me.

Post # 16
Member
1506 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

I’ve donated twice! Will do it more in the future, but I just did it in October so I have to wait a little bit before I can do it again. Feel free to PM me any questions!

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