Has anyone ever been made power of attorney for their parents?

posted 3 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 3
Member
3515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@tmsing:  My husband became power of attorney for his mom when she was very ill. It doesn’t mean you have to merge any bank accounts. If it’s medical POA that person basically has the responsibility of deciding what’s to happen medically. My husband had to give them the “ok” to take his mom off the breathing machine. He was also her POA financially. This just meant he was on her bank account as POA. He could not close the account or make any changes, he strictly is able to see what’s in there, make deposits & withdrawls. I’m not sure if every state is different though.. once the person passes the POA is void and they can no longer get access to the bank accounts. That’s why it’s also VERY important to be executor of that person (basically same as POA, it just takes over after the person passes.)

I think it’s very important to have someone you know & trust as a POA, technically they can drain the bank account as long as you’re still alive if they wanted to. It is a lot of responsibilty and scary to be someone’s POA, but your husband should do it. And trust me, I speak from experience, get all this paperwork together while the person is still healthy. We had to scramble around last minute as my MIL was on her deathbed, it was awful.

Post # 4
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

I have POA for my father, conditional on his disability or long term health problems. So it won’t kick in for a long time yet.

I’ve also been trying to get it for my mother… but it’s a lot harder when they resist…

Post # 5
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

I think being a POA varies state to state. I haven’t been made a POA but I have prepared a few of them at the law firm I work at.

A financial power of attorney, at least in my state, allows someone that you pay your bills and act on your behalf regarding real estate, etc., if you are unable to do so.

A medical power of attorney, again in my state, allows someone to make medical decisions for you if you are unable to do so. I had to have a colonscopy done a few years ago and I made my SO my medical power of attorney, just in case something would have happened because of how I react to being put under.

If you have questions, contact a lawyer. They will be able to explain exactly how things work in your state.

Post # 7
Member
3515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@tmsing:  We didn’t get a lawyer, but we didn’t have time. She signed the paperwork then went into a coma the next day & never woke up. As far as just getting POA paperwork, you can do it online – it’s not free, but I’m sure it’s cheaper than an attorney! When my husband brought the POA paperwork to the bank that’s all he needed to get on her account. They needed his general info to be on the account, but they never asked for his bank account info or anything like that. 

It’s a tough subject to bring up, because you’re basically planning for the person’s death or to become too sick to take care of stuff on their own. But it’s so important to have this stuff in order before that person is no longer able to. My parents are healthy & doing well but I’m encouraging to have them make me POA, it was (and still is) a nightmare trying to do stuff with his mom’s accounts, bills & house because he wasn’t the POA/executor.

Post # 8
Member
3515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@tmsing:  My personal opinon is you don’t need a lawyer just to get the POA paperwork. You just fill it out, print it out, sign it & have it notarized, it’s simple.

Post # 9
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

@tmsing:  I’m not 100% sure how things work on the mental side.

ETA: No, your friends cannot just legally say when to pull the plug, unless they are POA or they have some other legal document that gives them that power.

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