Hashimoto's thyroidits? But TSH & T4 fine? Do you have this?

posted 2 weeks ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
491 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2019

You’re not a U.K. Bee?

my FI Uses the thyroid advocacy forum, they’re extremely knowledgable, i highly recommend them – tpauk is what to google

Post # 4
Member
198 posts
Blushing bee

My TSH tested normal when I was diagnosed as well.  They ran an antibody test which showed to be off the charts, indicating that my thyroid was definitely under attack by the autoimmune response, even though I wasn’t technically hypo yet.  Get an antithyroid screen done.

Post # 5
Member
37 posts
Newbee

I’m actually heading to the doctor today for bloodwork because I am wondering about my thyroid after my recent fibroid diagnosis. From what I have read, some of your thyroid numbers can come back “normal” but you still have a thyroid issue. That’s why often it’s underdiagnosed.

Post # 6
Member
491 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2019

RedHeadKel :  it’s so useful and what they don’t know isn’t worth knowing 

Post # 7
Member
3051 posts
Sugar bee

You can have thyroid issues and still have one or more values within the normal range. Please keep in mind, too, that some doctors may be fine with a reading that is borderline-normal (barely within the normal range) which would not be considered ‘optimal’. I’ve had the issue where one of my readings is low and the other high….difficult to correct one without making the other worse. I highly recommend going to an endocrinologist and having a complete blood-work-up plus an ultrasound. 

Post # 9
Member
3051 posts
Sugar bee

RedHeadKel :  aww that sucks, let me revise my advice then – can you see a different endocrinologist who isn’t a douchebag and will take you seriously? That really pisses me off when a doctor won’t take someone seriously…..I had that with an ER doctor awhile back, I was having heart palpitations, doctor tried to dismiss me as having an anxiety attack without even running any tests and I was so pissed off. I told him if I was concerned enough to take time from my busy day to spend hours waiting in an ER I was going to damn well be taken seriously. And if I was having an anxiety attack, that should be taken seriously itself (as a mental health issue), but I’d appreciate him ruling out something life threatening first, turned out I was having PVCs. (trouble with a ventricle causing irregular heart beat) and referred to a cardiologist. It sucks that we have to advocate for our own health care when presented with a douchebag doctor that doesn’t seem to give a shit. 

Post # 10
Member
0 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: December 2002

Hi posting as anonymous but I am a doctor .The most common cause of thyroid disease is autoimmune that means that you have antibodies that either are overstimulating or understimulating the thyroid gland,small which is a small gland in your neck.TPO antibodies stand for thyroid peroxidase antibodies and that means you are at risk of developing thyroid disease.The patient is only started on treatment if their TSH ,T4 and T3 are abnormal sometimes these tests can be borderline and if you do not have symptoms then treatment can be deferred.If you get pregnant then that is an indication to start you on thyroxine regardless of your blood tests.Thyroid hormones are usually needed for metabolism so thyroid glands over stimulation will cause everything in your body to go fast that is you will have diarrhea,lose weight and your periods will become abnormal and with under stimulation everything slows down with your heart beating slow, weight gain,dry skin etc.If you do not have symptoms the next step forward would be to keep an eye on your thyroid functions tests every 6 months.TPO antibodies are not repeated again.

Post # 12
Member
0 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: December 2002

There is no point in repeating tpo antibodies because they are just indicative of your risk of developing thyroid disease .Thyroid function tests should be repeated.May I ask why was it done in the first place?It is a common disease in females and very easy to manage

Post # 13
Member
3051 posts
Sugar bee

RedHeadKel :  It boggles my mind that checking for gall bladder (and removing it if necessary) isn’t routine when someone has severe abdominal pain. Gall bladder attacks are far worse than the actual surgery- and delaying surgery can cause needless suffering and possible complications. I wish we had Star Trek level medical care & technology.

Post # 15
Member
0 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: December 2002

The antibodies can decline with treatment or remain the same  but repeating them will not achieve anything   as I said before their presence is just an indication of you having a high risk of developing thyroid disease rather than a way of monitoring disease.If you were on treatment before you can always start on  small dose of thyroxine and see if that helps with symptoms .Regarding doing ultrasound of neck,it is not routinely done but sometimes if a doctor feels nodules /enlarged thyroid it can be done.Also if thyroxine does not help you should do other investgations like your heamoglobin level,vitamin D etc.

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