Help! Dirty Moissy…

posted 3 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
1068 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@als1214:  I give mine a scrub with a toothbrush and some baking soda (or toothpaste, honestly) and it looks pristine!

Post # 4
Member
952 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@als1214:  I remember reading about this problem — it’s leftover residue from cutting the gem, I think. Go search on the BetterThanDiamond.com forums, there was a whole thread on the solution and it was an easy fix. 

If I recall I think it was either toothpaste or silver polish, or maybe WD40 that did the trick.  Hoepefully somebody else can chime in who remembers better than I. 

Post # 5
Member
318 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2018

I have the same problem!  I thought I was going crazy!  

Post # 6
Member
1465 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

I use a drop of dawn dish soap on a soft (baby) toothbrush to clean my rings. I have an Asha so it tends to pick up dust a bit easier than other rings. Make sure it’s the last thing you put on when you get ready (after lotion, sprays, hair stuff) and take it off if you’re cooking or cleaning.

Also, this might seem a bit obsessive, but blow dry your ring after you wash it. It will help cut down on water spots left after cleaning. I have pretty hard water so I notice spots too, but if I blow dry it, no spots!

Post # 7
Member
681 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Yes! Moissys get that weird film sometimes. It was driving me crazy and I starting googling it. I tried everything but the only thing that worked was rubbing the hard water stain with a magic eraser. I had to rub really vigorously for like ten minutes and it came right off. No damage to the stone but I couldn’t  get under the prong so there’s still a little bit there. I don’t know why moissys are so probe to these kind of water marks. 

Post # 8
Member
118 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2000

I resorted to a magic eraser, too, on one that developed the rainbow film/spotting! In time it reappeared, though. Never saw this on the other moissy I have, save for “normal” water spots.

Post # 10
Member
748 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

I’ve not seen it on mine so I’m not much help. I look now and again since reading about it. I clean all my jewelry in fairy liquid and hot water About once a week or fortnight time depending. 

Post # 11
Member
952 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@als1214:  Did you see my first post, above? I explained what causes it. Once you clean the residue it will not return. (:

Post # 12
Member
952 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Also normal cleaners like dish soap or diamond dazzle will not work. 

Post # 13
Member
6407 posts
Bee Keeper

Only the creators of the product know the answer, but it doesn’t seem to be from polishing because others have reported that it occured after a while (not present when they first got it) and others have said it reoccurs periodically.

I don’t know myself, but wonder if it has to do with an inherent property of the material when exposed to air or oils or something else. Below is a photo of a collector-grade piece of synthetic silicon carbide (not the version C&C make jewelry out of, this below is a nice example of the standard synthesized silicon carbide which is similar structurally to the natural SiC, except much larger crystals). What makes this piece so attractive in large part is that rainbow sheen, which has occured as a part of the synthesis of the SiC and potentially its exposure to natural elements in the air (that is, it hasn’t been sprayed on as a decorative coating or anything like that). The industrialized form of SiC, which is basically this stuff, ground up, tends to look like a blackish powder with no sheen, and I wonder if that’s because the sheen is a reaction that can take a while to occur, and I wonder, if some people say they don’t have this happen to their jewel but others do, whether that’s because some forms of the C&C jewels are more structurally similar to this more normative synthetic SiC and therefore are more likely to develop a rainbowy sheen.

“It is easily recognised by its dark blue-black colour, rainbow sheen (like the colours you see on oily water) and the extreme hardness, it will easily scratch glass and every common mineral except diamond. It is formed in blast furnaces during the production of iron.” http://www.mindat.org/min-40333.html

Post # 15
Member
6866 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2014 - A castle!

@als1214:  Do you have the FB enhanced stone? Just curious.

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