Help! My Puppy is Moody

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
7654 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

@hisgirl10:  Puppies require consistent training. She could have some separation anxiety becuase puppies need you to spend a lot of time with them. We trained our Saint in a matter of weeks with crate training, which was the best thing we could have done, and perhpas that might be an option for you. We also made it a point to take him out every two hours for the first so many weeks because we wanted to show him that outside was the place to pee.

Also with crating they will more than likely not pee in there if you have it small enough because they don’t want to pee in the place they lay, but you HAVE to make sure she will get adequate bathroom breaks and time with you. I don’t think she is doing this out a spite. I think she gets so excited to see you when you come home, then you take her out, and place her back in there alone. Puppies at that age can’t hold their bladder well, especially if they are scared, anxious, or excited. A puppy that age was also let go of her mother too early IMHO and may be displaying signs of that.

Post # 4
Member
8702 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

Gone for a while = Puppies generally can’t hold themselves for very long. She likely needs to go, so she does.

Home and then gone again = I’d be willing to bank on seperation anxiety.

You should start crating her when you leave. Puppies are like toddlers: They need constant supervision. If you cannot watch her, you need to crate her.

ETA: If she immediately goes fearful or submissive upon you or your SO finding her accidents, you’re doing something wrong. A dog should respect you as her alpha, she should never fear you. Do not scold her, hit her, rub her face in it, yell at her or otherwise act aggressively upon finding an accidents. Puppies have very short attention spans. She likely will not know why you are yelling at her and will adopt a fearful pose upon your arrival. They are singular minded. They do not go, “I see a poop pile over there. I bet that is why they are upset with me.” They see it as, “My alpha is exerting dominance over me. What did I do?”

I’m by no means an expert, but this was an issue with my lab when I first adopted him. Every time I would come home, he would submission urinate regardless of if he had done anything wrong. It’s still an issue to this day two years later. If my husband walks into the house “just right” in his combat boots, the dog hits the deck and becomes the most pathetic creature on the planet. We’re still working on it.

Post # 5
Member
373 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@hisgirl10:  I would think that having a puppy with special needs requires even more consistency and effective training methods.  Have you considered finding a trainer that specializes in blind/deaf dogs?  If you cannot communicate to your puupy in a way that she really understands, training will be difficult.

Post # 6
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

How old is this puppy and how long are you leaving her alone?  As was mentioned young puppies can only hold their bladder for a few hours.

Dogs don’t do things because they are “mad” or “jealous” etc, those are human emotions they are not capable of.  However, inappropriate elimination (so a house trained dog going in the house while you are away) is a symptom of separation anxiety.

If you are not already, this puppy would probably benefit from crate training, and if there is concern about separation anxiety behaviour modification training as well.

Post # 7
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

Puppies have accidents because they have small bladders and not much room in their little stomachs to hold on for a poo. They honestly don’t have the cognitive thinking process that makes them wee and poo in order to get back at you. However, anxiety about being left could also be a factor.

I think you need to consider how long you have to leave your pup since it sounds as if she’s being expected to wait for longer than is physically possible right now. Also, while puppy pads can be a helpful training accessory they still tend to send the message that indoors is just fine as a dog toilet. 

However, if your pup does have special needs then it may be that you need specific and more expert advice on training.

Post # 11
Member
462 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

She probably does know that she is not supposed to do it, but simply can’t hold it any longer! Do you feed or water her before you leave? Puppies generally can’t hold their blatter very long, and if she’s not going outside enough, she’s bound to have accidents. Dogs don’t do things like that because they’re mad at you, as a pp pointed out, that is more a human way of thinking, rather than a dog or puppy way of thinking. 

I do agree with the pp who said “Also, while puppy pads can be a helpful training accessory they still tend to send the message that indoors is just fine as a dog toilet.” She may be confused.

Post # 12
Member
8702 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

@hisgirl10:  Generally around 3 hours from my own personal experience. I have more experience training larger dogs (And one chihuahua) but generally size doesn’t matter when it comes to potty issues, so I’d stick with 3 hours or so. Is there someone you could get to give her a potty break midday?

The problem with paper training her is that you’re not. She has no clear boundaries where outside and inside start. She can pee where she wants, and the scent is very hard to get rid of, so she will always smell “Hey, I pee’d here before!” and repeat the cycle. She’s getting treats for going outside, but you’re allowing (by her logic) her to pee inside too.

Post # 13
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@hisgirl10:  I think 4 hours is quite a long time to hold on at 5 months. Also, as a pp has said, once she pees indoors, she leaves a scent that marks out what, to her, is a dog toilet. So clean up any accidents with biological washing powder diluted with water. It is one of the few things that disperses the smell to a dog.

Post # 14
Member
1043 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@hisgirl10:  4 hours should be fine for a large dog at 5 months old. My dogs have always been crate trained from day 1 that we bring them home. 2 were puppies, which was easier, but ive also crate trained a 4 year old foster dog. I cant imagine letting them roam the house while were gone. Our doberman can be crated for up to 10 hours on a really (reall really) bad day. She has never had an accident in her crate. 

 

She has less patience outside the crate. If we dont let her out after her first bell ring, she poops right by the door… Sooo happy we crate trained her lol 

Post # 15
Member
2593 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

Dogs/puppies don’t do things out of anger/spite.  My guess is she is confused or scared by you leaving, returning, and then leaving again so soon, and/or she is not entirely clear on where the acceptable potty places are.

At five months, she SHOULD be able to hold it for four hours.  Generally, paper/pad training at the same time you are outdoor training is frowned upon because it can confuse the puppy.  If you want her to “go” outside, you need to make that the ONLY place she is allowed to go.  It’s not too late to crate train; I would do that right away.

When you take her out, does she go quickly, or does it take her a while?  I know our dog will usually pee pretty quickly, but he doesn’t always poop right away unless he REALLY has to go.  Or does she pee in one spot, sniff around, pee again?  If you come home, take her out, then leave again quickly, does she have enough time to fully empty her bladder and poop if she needs to?  

If you feed her on a schedule, you should have an idea of what time(s) she poops each day, (keep track for a couple days if you need to).  Do your absences coincide with the times she poops, or is it completely out of her schedule?  If it coincides, that could be part of the problem.  If it is completle out of her normal “poop” times it is probably more fear/anxiety based.

Post # 16
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

You say she is mostly blind, how much does she see?  Can she actually see the paper where you are wanting her to go?  When she uses the paper while you are home is she finding it herself or are you taking her to it?  In general I’m not a fan of paper training, it’s either ok to go in the house or it’s not.

Four hours in the crate for her age should be ok, and if there are any potential issues with separation anxiety brewing getting her used to the crate now is a good idea as well.  I would try it, and start with shorter periods of time in the crate if you are able and then work up to the full amount of time she will need to be in there.

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