(Closed) Hepatitis B?

posted 5 years ago in Babies
  • poll: Was your baby vaccinated for Hepatitis B before leaving the hospital?
    Yes : (5 votes)
    56 %
    No : (3 votes)
    33 %
    N/A, this schedule did not apply during the time my child was born. : (1 votes)
    11 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    1622 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    As far as I know, most major organizations (CDC in the US, Health Canada etc) recommend Hepatitis B for newborns only if their mother is Hep B positive or if a member of the household (ie. sibling or primary care giver) is Hep B positive.

    Given the routes of transmission (bodily fluids), it’s highly unlikely that small children would be at a high risk, but exposed children are the most likely to have serious long-term consequences if they are infected so young so that’s the major arguement to vaccinate at a young age.

    ETA: sorry I didn’t answer any of your questions LOL. I don’t have children myself but do work in perinatal care for women and newborns.

    Post # 4
    Member
    5148 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    We did not vaccinate for Hep B at birth. We didn’t want to start vaccinating when he was freshly out of the womb, we wanted to give him a little time to get used to life on “the outside” first. 

    And the chances LO would be exposed to Hep B that early on are pretty much zero if the mother doesn’t have it. Babies aren’t going to be having sex or sharing needles; which is how Hep B is commonly transmitted.

    We were going to hold off on Hep B until a time that LO wasn’t getting so many shots, but then discovered that it’s very hard to find a polio vaccine that’s preservative free (polio is grouped with Hep B and DTap in a combo shot called Pediarix; you can get DTap and Hep B preservative-free seperately, but very hard to find the preservative-free polio seperate). So after discovering that, we decided to go ahead and do Hep B.

    We are splitting up shots so LO doesn’t get them all in 1 visit. For his 2-month shots, we got Rotovirus, Hib, and Pneumococcal at one visit, then Pediarix (Polio, Hep B, DTap) at another visit 2 weeks later.

    If you vaccinate for Hep B at birth, your baby ends up getting 4 shots of it instead of 3 because Hep B is done in combo vaccines. Having an extra dose is considered okay by the CDC.

    Post # 6
    Member
    84 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: August 2012

    @abbyful:  I used to work as a nursery nurse and here in Iowa our hep b is only hep b, not a combo vaccine.

    On that note, I find no reason to vaccinate with hep b at such a young age. 🙂

    Post # 7
    Member
    5148 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    @jasonashley – Yeah, my pediatrician had single-vial preservative-free Hep B seperate as an option, as well as preservative-free DTap as a seperate option. The problem was the polio vaccine. I couldn’t find anywhere that had polio vaccine as single-vial preservative-free; polio was only available alone containing preservatives, the only preservative-free polio is in combo shots. So I decided I’d rather go ahead and get the Hep-B done instead of getting the polio vaccine with preservatives.

    Post # 8
    Member
    23 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: December 2013

    I didn’t vote in the poll because I do not have children yet but I just finished my maternity clinical for nursing school. I gave the newborns the vaccines (both Hep.B and Vit.K). I would check with your insurance company-I know this may sound silly & not very sensitive but some of the patients I was caring for stated that their insurance wouldn’t pay for the vaccine day of but would at the first doctor’s appointment (or vice versa). I can also say that the newborns didn’t seem to be bothered by it too much.

    Straight from my maternity text published 2010– “HepB vaccination is recommended for all infants […] for HB-negative women the first dose of the vaccine may be given at birth or at 1 month of age”

    All in all it is your decision to give the vaccine at birth or at the checkup. And in case you didn’t know the Vit.K injection is to help prevent bleeding–they’ll ask you to sign off on this injection as well if you want to research it 🙂

     

    Good luck in your decision and congrats on the coming addition to your family!

     

     

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