Homeschooling- education levels of teaching parent

posted 3 years ago in The Lounge
  • poll: How much education/training should a homeschooling parent have?
    High school diploma : (21 votes)
    10 %
    Associates degree or equivalent : (8 votes)
    4 %
    Bachelors degree or equivalent : (124 votes)
    56 %
    Masters Degree : (31 votes)
    14 %
    It doesn't matter- there should be no restrictions : (16 votes)
    7 %
    Other- let me explain : (20 votes)
    9 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    6875 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: March 2014 - A castle!

    @eeniebeans:  Great topic! FI and I were discussing this last night, as a friend of mine on FB wants to homeschool her daughter.

    She wrote, “I think we are going to try it (homeschooling) – at least for a year or two. Daughter is so much a hands on learner that I feel it would work best to get her basic skills cemented through exploration and movement based activities. Anyone have good/bad experiences with different materials? Any feedback is absolutely appreciated. 

    (Except criticism of the format or complaints that homeschooled kids are at a disadvantage socially or otherwise. Heard it all.)”


    For some reason this *really* grinds my gears. I know as a parent she has the right, but she has a high school education and nothing more. Her daughter is kindergarten aged. I don’t understand how “exporation and movement based activities” will help her learn how to read and write. That’s just my 2 cents.

    Personally, I think that a parent should at least have a teaching certificate or some kind of teaaching related associates degree, at the minimum.


    Post # 4
    Member
    2419 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    I’ve voted “Other” because I’m not sure that academic qualifications (other than, say, a teaching degree and experience as a teacher) necessarily makes someone a good home educator. Having worked in academia and being married to someone who did their doctorate has left me quite certain that the highest educational attainments do not necessarily translate into practical application.

    I would, however, be concerned if anyone planning to home educate hadn’t reached basic levels of literacy (including IT literacy) and numeracy themselves. Because home education isn’t necessarily an easy option. Ideally, a teaching qualification would be preferable.

     

    Post # 5
    Member
    10748 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2014

    I wasn’t fully homeschooled, but I did skip ahead in math because I was bored out of my mind with all the dummies in my grade 10 class. My teacher suggested I complete the year and do grade 11 by correspondence so that I could take grade 12 in my grade 11 year at high school and be free to take calculus during my grade 12 year. So I did, and my mom helped me with the assignments at home. She was a teacher/stay at home mom with a math/science degree. She was totally capable of teaching me but if she hasn’t had that, it would have been a different story since I would have had to teach myself if I had any problems. 

    For young kids I think all you’d really need is a high school degree, because the basic stuff they’re learning at that age is something any adult should just inherently know. But towards high school age I think they’d need more training, like a bachelor’s degree for the the trickier things like math/science. I don’t think social studies/English etc matters though. I always thought those were just filler courses anyway. 

    Post # 6
    Member
    43 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    @eeniebeans

    I’m a teacher myself, and have an M.A. My FI is doing his M.Sc. and plans to do a Ph.D. We are probaly going to homeschool, and are in the idea position to do so ecause 1) I am a teacher qualified to teach up to Gr. 12! and 2) FI was homeschooled himself and loved it! His dad homeschooled him and his sister, and he dropped out of university himself. he is a farmer and house-painter but he also writes books, and is one of the most brilliant, with-it people I have ever met in my life. And his children both went on to do advanced degrees so clearly he did something right!

     

    So I guess my point is it all depends on someone’s skill as a teacher and the broadness of their knowledge base, not their education level.

     

    Post # 7
    Member
    43 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    @Pinkmoon:  lol that’s a bit rude with your English/social sciences comment. You don’t think critical thinking and analysis of a variety of media and historical texts is important??? You don’t think skill in writing in a variety of forms is useful? How would academic papers ever get written without study of English? How would young people develop media literacy? I’m sorry it seems that you had bad teachers in these subjects, but I assure you, my English classes (that I teach!) are all about critical thinking, and we look at a huge variety of texts, from documentaries to social media and news to, yes, traditional literature. English is all about questioning the messages presented, and knowing how to pick it apart, so you can be an informed and active participant in global matters.

     

     

     

    Post # 8
    Member
    3570 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

    I think you should only be allowed to home school if you have a teaching degree.  My neice and nephew are homeschooled and I think it is ridiculous.  I almost wish it were illegal.  

    Post # 9
    Member
    2454 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    If we went with our current goal of living as digital nomads with our children, we would most likely homeschool out of necessity.

    I have a degree in education (music, but still) and am going to start applying to master’s programs in international development. I have several years of teaching and tutoring experience in public and private schools. My FI has a master’s in English and taught at several community colleges for years. 

    The only subject that would challenge us is math. Both of us are not math people. We would probably have to find an advanced tutor when our children hit high school level.

    Post # 11
    Member
    43 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    @MrsTVLover:  And I wish some things that go on in the public school system were illegal. I can’t tell you how much abuse my FI was exposed to, both from teachers (mental, phsychological) and students (physical) before his parents pulled him out to homeschool. he grew up in this tiny rural community where there was only one school that didn’t offer any enrichment programs, and furthermore was very repressive, pushing socially conservative and heavily religious agends on impressionable children. It really makes sense to pull your child out of school if you’re confident you can do a better job than that. Perhaps this is an extreme example, but I don’t see why you think homeschooling is so ridiculous. In every school district in Canada it is the law that a superintendant of the schoolboard (or at least a principal) will make home visits to ensure that homeschooled children are up to, or exceeding, the standard for academic achievement in their grade. Otherwise they wouldn’t be allowed to be homeschooled!

     

    Post # 13
    Member
    1629 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

    My fundamentalist in laws are homeschooling their children and I fear that they will be significantly disadvantaged in the future because of it.  The mother (the parent who will be “teaching”) barely graduated high school and has told me several times that she disliked school.  She never had any aspirations to become anything other than a wife and mother so she never tried to do anything other than scrape by in school.  In addition to her being very uneducated, they are using a “young earth creationist” curriculum for their children, which I think is insane.  On the other hand, I have a friend whose sister and she were homeschooled until high school by their very well educated parents and they are two of the smartest and most successful people I know.  Based on that experience, I truly think that the homeschooling parent should have at least a bachelor’s degree and they should either find an appropriate tutor or enroll their children in school once the curriculum goes beyond what the parent can comfortably teach.

    Post # 14
    Member
    1470 posts
    Bumble bee

    @runty_bunting:  it all depends on someone’s skill as a teacher and the broadness of their knowledge base, not their education level.

    I agree, love your FI’s story! There are people who can pass all the Praxis exams in the world that shouldn’t go near a child, let alone teach them. I have no experience with home schooling so I can only spout my opinion but for me, the ability to teach someone comes from the knowledge and capacity to pass along that knowledge, and the knowledge doesn’t neccessarily have to come from formal education.

    Post # 15
    Member
    513 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: July 2014

    I think regardless of actual educational attainment, if someone is going to homeschool their kids, they need to have a certain level of knowledge of childhood development, and milestones etc. They’d also need to consider/ ensure that the child is getting the necessary skills to move on to post secondary education, if they want to pursue that. I also think that to homeschool your own children, you’d have to have a very high degree of objectivity, and be able to to see your child as a student, and not necesarily your child when it comes to teaching/testing.

    Post # 16
    Member
    3570 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

    @runty_bunting:  Thank you for your perspective.  It does make me think. 

    My SIL talks about how the public schools are crap.  I find that offensive because my brother and sister are teachers.  She couldn’t bear to be away from her kids during the day, so she is home schooling three of them.  They are all different ages, and they are all really screwed up and lack basic social skills.  She also has a newborn.  I feel so sorry for her kids, and I wish someone would intervene and say, “These kids need public school.”  She isn’t a very smart woman, and did not go to college.  She does not understand child development, and teaches them things out of order.  Her kids can barely read or print, but can write in cursive.  They took the month of December off, for Christmas.  I think the real losers in this situation are the children, who are missing out on a real education and social experience.  

    I am sorry that your FI had a bad experience.  This is why taxes are a big issue for me.  Taxes & education are really interconnected for me.  I bet in that rural town, his family paid very little taxes.  I hope one day things will change and taxes will be divided across a state and not remain in particular townships to which they are paid.  That being said, people love to complain about how bad public schools are, and then don’t want to pay high property taxes.   

     

     

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