(Closed) Hot Yoga

posted 9 years ago in Fitness
Post # 3
Member
1042 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

What exactly is hot yoga?

Post # 5
Member
1042 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

Ohh, I haven’t heard of hot yoga, but I have heard of Bikram. Hopefully we have some yoga bees who can help you out…

Post # 6
Member
611 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I’m excited for you that you got this new job. However, I’m going to give my 2 cents. I have been practicing yoga for several years and my sister is also a yoga teacher. Based on what I have heard about bikram yoga, it does not sound good to me (at least for me personally). That was why I only tried once but will probably never try it again.

The hot temperature tends to allow people to overstretch so there should be more precaution for injury. It tends to make people oversweat so constant hydration is a must, which is atypical of a yoga practice (where one drinks before and after but not during). The hot temperature also allows people to warm up their body automatically so the body does not get a chance to train to warm up on its own. Bikram is limited in the number of doable poses. I think my sis said something like 100 or 200 poses are allowed in bikram while normal yoga is like in the thousands. From personal experience: E.g. arm balances are difficult because sweat makes everything slippery.  And people also cannot do inversions because of the temperature.

Why I think it has become very popular in the western culture is because the hot temperature gives the illusion of flexibility so people has some instant gratification. Because of shedding some water, people also have the illusion that they lost weight. Some ppl may argue that yoga originates in a climate that is hot so bikram is actually normal. However, people living in different climate have different body natures/types in order to adjust to their different environment. And it is important for yoga to be practiced in context of the natural state instead of an artificial temperature.

Sorry to rag on hot yoga but I cannot deny it’s a great job opportunity and great business though. Congratz and be extra careful!

Post # 7
Member
209 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

What do you expect from a class?  Why do you choose hot yoga instead of going to a regular yoga studio?  What has a teacher done in a hot yoga class that’s been super rad for you?

I don’t take classes in a studio any longer, choosing to practice Iyengar at home, but I used to do Bikram (I have a love-hate relationship with Bikram). I’ve been to 4 studios here in the city and have one favorite that I would go to if I ever returned to Bikram. At my favorite studio the teachers always asked if there were people with injuries in the room and modified my poses (knee injury) to something that was comfortable for me. These teachers always looked out for me during certain poses and told me to back off or take it easy. These teachers had nice, soothing voices and didn’t lecture during the asanas.

Pren79 is right in that people certainly do overstretch, especially type A people who are so used to pushing themselves. It’s always nice to get reminders from the teachers that this class is not about who can stretch the furthest, who is most flexible, but that the practice is very personal and listen to your bodies. I’ve been turned off by the teachers who bark asanas and push really hard or act like they’re teaching an aerobics class, one teacher told me that doing a certain position would help me even after I said it was painful.

I don’t think the popularity of hot yoga or Bikram is due to the flexibility thing, but definitely due to the illusion of weight loss (though plenty of people have lost weight doing Bikram regularly, including myself) but also because some people just can’t get into yoga. I know people who would never do a "regular" yoga class but would take Bikram in a heartbeat because they think it’s more challenging (people stereotype yoga a lot).

So, be aware of your students, be a guide and be firm but don’t push too hard. Hope that helps.

Post # 9
Member
424 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I did Bikram for about a year. IT WAS WONDERFUL! I loved it. It took about 5 consistent classes for me to get used to it, but walked out of the room floating…drove home and felt like I was floating…I just felt great the entire day. When I get a chance to drop in a yoga class, I tend to choose hot or Bikram over just a regular class. I just feel like it pushes me more. Most of the instructors involved with Bikram have always been patient and are able to help students at all levels–so it doesn’t feel like they are being pushy or trying to push you too much out of your comfort zone….all in all, they just make me feel more comfortable. Good luck! 

Post # 10
Member
278 posts
Helper bee

I go to different hot yoga studios in NYC and what I find enjoyable varies in each place.  I think the teacher really matters in this case.  I do hot vinyasa yoga and I tend to enjoy the teachers that don’t breeze through each pose.  Since I’m at a beginner’s level, this is very important.  I like to know what my body is capable of without overdoing it.  I’m a frequent visitor at Big Apple Yoga (where Alanis Morissett’s brother plays the guitar and sings for us live!)  It’s a small studio but the teachers pay attention to each person’s capacity.

Although I somewhat agree with the comments above about hot yoga, it works out great for me because I normally don’t sweat.  Yes – it takes being in a heated room to sweat and it feels great!  It may not be for everyone but it really does work for some!

Post # 12
Member
444 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I’m a big fan of hot yoga (Bikram and Vinyasa)…in fact, I only prefer to practice hot yoga.  I love it because 1) makes me sweat! (I also don’t sweat much usually, but hot yoga has done wonders improving my circulation and promoting sweating/detoxing.) 2) raises heart rate and can combine yoga and cardio. 3) feels like a work out. 

One thing that I needed my instructor to remind me constantly at first was to keep my eyes open and focussed.  Being in hot room, you don’t want to close your eyes and relax (at least not until the very end when cooling down). 

Good luck w/ your new job and have fun!

Post # 13
Member
3332 posts
Sugar bee

I haven’t done it in a few years, but I used to love bikram yoga.  Man, you sure sweat a lot, but I always felt really refreshed and cleansed after class.  I think it’s really important as an instructor that you encourage folks to work at their ability level and offer modifications if possible.  If you have people who are new to the class, maybe check in with them to see what their familiarity with yoga and the poses are, just so that you can keep an eye on their form.  I know I had a lot of yoga experience before I started bikram, so the poses and postures were familiar to me.  I could progress a little faster than people who had never done yoga before. 

I tried bikram because I wanted to change up my workout routine a little.  I was looking at it more from a fitness angle than a weight loss one, which I think works better for me.  I wanted to increase my flexibility and challenge myself to try something out of my comfort zone.  I think people do say stuff about how you lose weight doing this type of yoga, but honestly, I think it did more for my flexibiity than weight loss specifically.  

I also like Latoya’s suggestion to be "firm but don’t push too hard".  I know, I generally like an instructor to challenge me a little, because I tend to remain more focused.   Also, remind people, especially the newbies, to make sure to drink a lot of water after class.  I always found I was super dehydrated if I didn’t!

Where is your class, mambinki?

Post # 15
Member
815 posts
Busy bee

I’ve been practicing Bikram yoga for the past month and there are definately some great things and things I don’t like.  The thing I really like about hot yoga is the feeling of purification and detoxification.  I love that it gets my heart rate up.  And I find the heat to be relaxing and comforting.  There’s something so soothing about entering the hot room at the end of a long day.  I like instructors that help me stay focused without being too forceful.  I had one instructor that sort of barked repetitvely and got mad when people moved too soon.  And I agree that I appreciate teachers that are mindful of injuries and encourage people not to push too hard.  I wish I had a yoga studio around me that focused on hot yoga instead of Bikram yoga (don’t like doing the same asanas every day, and I don’t really like that it’s a copyrighted yoga).

Post # 16
Member
3332 posts
Sugar bee

OMG, I forgot about how red my face gets when I do that class!  I have skin that’s prone to a little redness anyway, and when I used to get back from class, I’d look like a tomato!

Too bad you’re so far away, mambinki, or I’d take your class!  I may actually be visiting Seattle later in the summer, I’ll PM you if I’m in town. 🙂

The topic ‘Hot Yoga’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors