(Closed) How difficult is it to DIY an invitation suite?

posted 9 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
2725 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

First-Welcome!!!

I would say it all depends on how elaborate you want to get. I did mine, very simpley and very inexpensively. For about $30 (not including postage) I did a 5X7 flat panel card. It had 3 layers-an opal metalic layer, then a light pink layer, then a cream colored layer that the info was printed on. I used Microsoft Publisher but I also could have very easily used Microsoft Word. I printed two invites on 8 1/2 X 11 cream colored card stock. Then on the printed cream colored layer, I used the Martha Stewart daisy/eyelet border punch to punch the the top and bottom edges so you could see the pink paper through the eyelet. I made the RSVP card postcards using Publisher. I used the official Postal Service dimensions-3 1/2 by 5 I believe and printed them on cream colored card stock and then stamped a daisy on each one. I printed my maps using one of the bee’s tutorials. I can’t remember which one-Mrs. Spring Roll, Mrs. Ballet Flat, and another bee I can’t remember all have DIY tutorials on maps. I just put DIY map in the search box. We ended up doing about 52 invites. Everything was easy and simple-no fancy designs-so for us, it was worth it.

Hope this helps!

Post # 4
Member
2725 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

Oh and the layers-the opal metalic layer was 5X7, the pink layer was 4 3/4 X 6 3/4, and the cream colored layer was 4 1/2 X 6 1/2. And I got most of the paper and envelopes at a local store near me that you pay for the paper by the pound-very cheap. The rest I got at a scrapbooks store, and I used stamps and the punch that I already had.

Post # 5
Member
96 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I DIYed my invites but I do graphics for a living – but maybe it’s not that hard for someone without a ton of experience… if you already know kinda what you want. I did mine beacuse I was also really picky and I knew if I did them myself I’d get exactly what I wanted.

It’s not that "hard" to do your own if you have some time (for designing AND assembling), a good program (I used Illustrator) and examples of suites you like. It’s also good to pick a few fonts (one script and one block) and a universal graphic. Dover books are always good for flower/orante artwork or you could try istockphoto for some vector (editable) graphic.

If you have something to go off of and you know what pieces you need it’s probably doable. How are you printing them (I used a really nice home printer) and assembling them. Are you buying extra pieces like U-folds or enclosures? I don’t know much about Gocco but I think supplies are limited now – other people have said something about Gocco going away? Dunno. You could also design all the pieces and send them out for printing, I know of a letterpress guy in Utah who’s pretty cheap – Mandate Press.

This was mine – good luck!

[attachment=295806,35648]

Post # 8
Member
143 posts
Blushing bee

Goccos are awesome, but I’d be wary of relying on them as a primary DIY printer at this point as supplies are running low and there’s lots of supply hoarding on eBay.

Designing your own stationery can be a rewarding process, but can also be very frustrating – it might cost less, but there is still a pretty substantial monetary investment involved (time, programs, typography). I think maybe the least stressful way to go is to purchase all the designs digitally from Etsy or from a designer, outsource the printing (assuming you are printing on white or light-coloured paper, digital printing is fairly cost-effective) and then assemble them yourself.

For napkins, you could have a custom rubber stamp made with your design or monogram and then stamp plain napkins – just be sure to use permanent ink (I’ve heard that Staz-On is good) so that it won’t come off on your guests!

Post # 10
Member
143 posts
Blushing bee

You could check out the Yudu as well, which is like the Gocco. I think they have yet to come out with a screen fine enough for printing very small and delicate invitation details, but that would be less of an issue with certain designs.

I love old-fashioned printing techniques as well! These DIY poster invitations were screen printed, and are one of my favourite invitation sets ever. As an alternative, it is also possible to make a digitally printed piece look more hand-printed using Photoshop!

Post # 11
Member
117 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

I’m finishing up with my diy invitation suite.  I couldn’t find anything that I liked either, so I ended up finally finding the perfect color of eggplant cardstock (after searching everywhere and being sent several samples) and making my own pocketfolds from 12×12 sheets of cardstock.  I purchased a vector illustration from istockphoto.com and downloaded a couple fonts I liked and gave them to a graphic designer at FI’s firm who offered to put my ideas onto paper.  I decided I liked the idea of wax seals, but couldn’t find a design that I liked, so I found a place that did a design based on the vector illustration.  I’ve spent many, many hours researching blogs of other diy brides and taking bits and pieces of their designs to come up with my own.  I’ve also spent many, many hours scoring, folding, cutting, pasting, and taping everything together.  And I’m still not done yet.

There have been times I’ve thought that I must be crazy for doing this.  I probably am, but it’s worth it because I’m getting exactly what I want, and it’s very satisfying to see everything coming together.  Also, there’s a little part of me that just can’t wait til they all get sent out so I can (hopefully) hear about how fabulous everyone thinks they are!  🙂

So, to answer your question, it can be as difficult as you want to make it.  But the pride you feel when finish something like this makes it all worth while.

Good luck!  🙂

 

Post # 12
Member
4480 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: March 2010 - Calamigos Ranch

Yeah, it really depends on how much you want to do. You can actually do a lot just in programs like Microsoft Word if you don’t want to take the time to learn how to use Illustrator… although illustrating your suite would be hard, that way. 🙂 You can also always commission an artist to design them and send you the files to print yourself.

The topic ‘How difficult is it to DIY an invitation suite?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors