How do you narrow in on a dream?

posted 2 years ago in Career
Post # 2
484 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2015

I went through this too.

I had so many ideas and dreams and wondered whether there was enough time to get it all done in one small life?!

My family told me that there doesn’t have to be a trade off – you can do it all! Just pace yourself and go with what calls to you the most right now, then when you’re satisfied with that or feel the call for something else, move on. You might just find that the first thing is the best thing and you are content to drop your other ideas because this one is so great!

To me, I can see all of those dreams being combined into one! <br />How about you move up north, work with seniors where you can plan their day trips and talks and visits, then work in the coffee/break room for their afternoon coffee?

I have no idea if that is how care homes work in your/that area, but there’s no reason why you can’t find out and give it a go.

Then you can see if one of them really shines out for you, or whether actually, all of them are the best combo!

Good luck with your quest! x

Post # 3
4762 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Hmmm, well what do you do now? What is your education background? Part of it is weighing pros and cons about what it will take to get to a certain career.

Post # 4
1107 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

I know the feeling! I went from Veterinary medicine, to Hairstyling, to Advertising haha.  Completely different fields, and to be honest, I still haven’t found something I really love.  As we get older, our likes and dislikes change and so I feel you should start with the one that you could see yourself in right this minute. And who knows, 10 years from now you might be in a completely different field.

Post # 5
77 posts
Worker bee

I have had this problem my entire life. I never knew what I wanted to do when I grew up, let alone what I want to do now that I’m out of college. I kind of feel lost and don’t know how people developed career dreams. All I’ve ever wanted was to have a decently comfortable salary, a modest house, and to have a happy life without having to worry about money.

Post # 6
94 posts
Worker bee

This is a feeling I think a lot of people can relate to. For the longest time, I had this idea that there was a dream career for me out there, and a terrible fear that I wasn’t going to be able to figure out what it was that would make me happy. I happened to know several very driven people who knew exactly what they wanted to do, which only made my own confusion seem worse by comparison.

I realized a few things that may help.

You don’t have to love your career. There may not be a “dream” career out there for everyone, and that’s ok. I thought for years there was something wrong with me – that I didn’t have a “dream” the way others did because I didn’t have a career goal in mind. For a lot of people, their career means a job that they don’t despise and a means to pay the bills. Their focus isn’t on their career as the means to make them happy, but rather to give them the money and time to pursue the things that do make them happy.

For me, my career rose out of just that: a job to pay the bills. It wasn’t what I had in mind when I went to school. I’d finally worked out a career path and nothing came of it (no openings in the area and I wasn’t able to move). So I took a part time position for a year while looking for other things. It was only after being there for a bit that I realized I actually enjoyed the work and made the decision to focus on that instead of what I’d thought would be my career. If you can find something of value in your work, whether it’s the work itself, pride you take in your job, or the work-life balance, then you can enjoy where you are right now.

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