how much is $5 million worth to you?

posted 3 years ago in Career
  • poll: would you move for a good job that pays $5 mil more over 20 years?
    heck yeah! : (77 votes)
    79 %
    maybe : (19 votes)
    19 %
    no way! : (2 votes)
    2 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    1253 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: May 2015

    @anon224:  Oh honey, a transition like this is very hard. You are still not settled and still surrounded with memories of the other place.  But right now, you need to do your best to not dwell on it. Dust yourself off and start making the best of it. Not every place is going to be a good fit for everyone, but people determined to be happy will find joy in whatever circumstance.  

    You’ll start your job, get more settled in, find a routine, and things will be better. And you’re not in prison! Give it a year, maybe two, and if you’re still really not satisfied, you can always look for a more fulfilling job and move again! For now, just feed on the positive energy of your husband, be happy you have him as a stability point even if all else is new, and look to enjoy your new life focusing on the neat things it does have, not the things it doesn’t.

    Best of luck! 🙂

    Post # 5
    Member
    2302 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: June 2015

    @anon224:  give it a good shot – go out to dinner, invite the neighbours over for a bonfire, volunteer somewhere etc. really try!

    but – you can always move back. you’re not stuck. remind yourself of that!

    Post # 6
    Member
    1007 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    I obviously don’t know the details of your career track but usually once you have a certain salary on your salary history, you can go looking for a new job and get something similar or better (especially, I would think, in your original bigger city).  Spend a couple years at your new job and hopefully you can find something similar in a better location. 

    Post # 7
    Member
    1599 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    SO you’re lookng at a $250k annual increase?! At that rate you can retire early and move wherever you want within 10 years!

     

    Post # 9
    Member
    2825 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    Awww, honey. I understand. You’d be surprised how much I understand. For the record, the sadness goes away, and you are very fortunate to have the one you love near. Also, I’m very impressed that you’re thinking in 20 year increments. I cannot and do not do that. Instead, I’d look at it as making $250k each year (if that’s what it works out to). Because my husband will be with me, I consider all things bearable. That said, I have the kind of job where I must make such a decision every couple of years. The only time I have ever (and would ever) turn down that kind of money is if my life would be in significant danger. Every few months, I hear of one of my colleagues tragically dying out in the field. THAT is precisely why they offer so much money to move to such places. At any rate, so there’s no art museum and no local Thai restaurant. So what? Travel on weekends, take up a hobby, adopt some pet projects, start your family if you wish. Your culture is something you take with you and it isn’t dependent on the abundance of yelp reviews in your area. Just this morning, I made my favorite exotic meal. I could’ve sat home being depressed about how there’s no place in this entire flipping country where I could buy such a meal, but…instead I googled a recipe, substituted some of the ingredients and made it myself. That’s the way it’s going to be for my future husband and I for awhile. But we have each other. We’ll live. And so will you!

    Post # 11
    Member
    133 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: November 2012

    It’s an extra 20,000 a month. Go shop your sorrows away.

    Post # 13
    Member
    2825 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    @anon224:  just read your update. My cousin, a neurosurgeon, was in this exact predicament. Except it was her new husband who was offered a job in the backwoods and she left her fancy big city hospital and followed him like a dutiful [pregnant] wife. They got divorced months (MONTHS!) later and she found herself stuck in a cultural wasteland with a newborn but something she didn’t have previously…tons of money! lol. It was really difficult for her in the beginning, but you’d be surprised at how much comfort hundreds of thousands of extra dollars will bring. I’m not even joking. She’s now started her own practice, bought her home outright and she and her daughter travel abroad a couple of times per year. I’m not privy to her innermost thoughts or anything, but she definitely seems to have adjusted quite well and to date, she still hasn’t retreated back to the city. 

    Post # 14
    Member
    1787 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    I recently moved from a city and job that I loved to be with my FI.  It’s rough making a huge transition like that, but it will get better once you adjust.

    Post # 15
    Member
    1367 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    You can always go back. And you can always visit.  I left my country for a better job (and not nearly as much $ as you stand to make.)  Even though I miss my friends and family I have never regretted it (and besides, almost everyone turns up in NYC eventually!)

    Post # 16
    Member
    1007 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @anon224:  That makes a little more sense.  But like PP have said, think about all the fun things you can do with all that extra money!  Not sure how much time you’ll get off, but you can go on amazing vacations, pay off those loans, maybe still retire early, never have to worry about money.  You could work at this position long enough to knock out your loans and then transfer back to the city and work for a lower rate but without any loan payments. 

    Leave a comment


    Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

    Find Amazing Vendors