(Closed) how much to donate?

posted 4 years ago in The Lounge
  • poll: Funeral donation
    $0-$25 : (2 votes)
    7 %
    $26-$50 : (9 votes)
    31 %
    $51-$75 : (5 votes)
    17 %
    $76 - $100 : (1 votes)
    3 %
    $100-$200 : (8 votes)
    28 %
    more : (1 votes)
    3 %
    have not done funeral donations : (3 votes)
    10 %
    will never do funeral donations : (0 votes)
  • Post # 3
    Member
    2945 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: February 1998

    @lstyle25:  I’m a little confused as to where the donated money will go????

    Post # 5
    Member
    1786 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @Holly77:  It typically goes to the family in a sympathy card to offset the unexpected medical costs and costs of a funeral.

    Post # 6
    Member
    6018 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: March 2012

    I’d probably do about $30.00-50.00.  It sounds like you have a bond with the co-worker and thru him, his son.  This really is terrible, how nice of you all to think of him during this time. 

    Post # 7
    Member
    1902 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2012

    What a sad story! Honestly, in this situation, I would give whatever I could afford – so probably about $100-150 to help them with this. Not only are funerals ridiculously expensive, but I doubt the parents will be up for working much over the next little while.

     

    Post # 8
    Member
    2550 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: April 2013

    Is this customary? isn’t it a little weird?  If it is, I guess I’d send about 100. But I’d rather send something else, like homemade meals.

    Post # 9
    Member
    2254 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @LadyElva:  +1.

    Honestly, give what you are comfortable giving and/or what you can afford. I’m sure the family will be grateful for anything you can contribute.

    Post # 10
    Member
    2945 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: February 1998

    If the money is being giving to the family for funeral expenses I’d definetly give $100 and I’d send flowers and a card. This is so very sad. I will hug my boys even harder tonight:(

    Post # 11
    Member
    1902 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2012

    @bebero:  I would second this, as well. If you feel close enough to this co-worker, a few casseroles or pots of soup don’t go astray during funeral times. It’s so hard to remember to take care of yourself when you’re grieving, so it’s handy to have friends and family that can help you out.

    Post # 12
    Member
    3887 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

    I’d donate time instead of money, or have the office set up a scholarship fund in the son’s name. Grief does incredibly unpredictable things to people, and there’s a huge risk that small amounts of cash trickling in here and there will be mistaken in their intent. Face it, funerals are really expensive and unless you are in a very large and generous office, you’ll barely make a dent. Because anger is a very normal emotion when dealing with a young person’s death, these small gifts, even though very well-intended, may serve as a catalyst for that anger. 

    Bake a casserole and drop it off to the family. Having been through the death of a loved one, I can promise that this simple gesture will bring a lot of comfort. The family likely isn’t eating. Offer to clean their home or run the laundry for them. People don’t focus on these daily tasks when they are grieving. But it needs to be done. I promise they will appreciate that more than $50 or $100, especially when they’re staring at a $9000 funeral bill. If you’ve got access to airline miles, offer to fly in a loved one from out-of-town. Bereavement fares and last-minute tickets are really expensive and may make it impossible for their loved ones to be there.

    or set up a scholarship in the son’s name, perhaps to go to a promising young athlete, or create an award for a talented young athete in the son’s name.

    Post # 13
    Member
    514 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    My Grandpa died a few months ago, and I can tell you none of us wanted to have a bunch of food sitting around. I am not sure why people always want to make things for grieving people, but I am sure money would be more appreciated, since funerals are very expensive.

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