How should I approach the breeder?

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@megz06:  I am so sorry this happened. Your puppy is adorable and that is the last update I saw. I will have to go back and read your other threads, though I can tell they will be heartbreaking.

I think the breeder has done what she is “supposed to do” in that she offered to take the puppy back (and I assume refund your money?). If you are choosing to keep him, and I am so happy that you are, then I believe the financial responsibility lands on you because it was your choice to keep him rather than exchange him.

I could be wrong, but that is the way that I see it.

Post # 4
Member
5932 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

@megz06:  Review the contract you signed to buy the puppy, it should outline what, if any compensation you’re entitled to should the dog pass away, or have certain illnesses or traits that could be avoided or weeded out with breeding and screening….either way, most clauses contain a requirement that the puppy in question be relinquished to the breeder because you can’t have it both ways…you don’t get to keep the dog and have her pay for it….plus, at what point does the money stop?

You’re more than welcome to ask, but be prepared for her to decline to compensate, after all, breeding isn’t a science with a 100% success rate, you take a gamble on any animal you adopt because life is the ultimate roulette wheel.

Post # 6
Member
7075 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Did you have a contract? Most breeders have some sort of health guarantee, but usually they offer to replace the puppy, not refund your money. You could try asking, but I honestly don’t think they are going to give you anything.

Post # 7
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Agree with PPs that you contract would probably just be for her to replace the puppy if health issues were to come up, not pay for vet care and you keep the puppy.  Many breeds have their problems, but lab breeders don’t pay their owners when they need knee surgery and dachschund breeders don’t pay their owners when they need back surgery etc.

I think keeping her up to date with what is going on with your puppy and if you decide to do the MRI would be helpful for her breeding decisions in the future.  Hopefully whe will not breed the same pair again in hopes of reducing the chances of this happening to another puppy, but you never know.

Post # 8
Member
156 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@megz06:  You’re right. Any good, ETHICAL, breeder would not breed a dog with genetic problems and agree to the compensation.

I also got a dog from a breeder. He developed a condition where his lashes grow inward causing ulcers in the pupils, a condition common in certain breeds. Surgery was 3k. Our breeder had pretty much assured us that his dogs were problem free/ or with problems bred away, so when this arose, they paid for all surgical costs. They did offer a new dog, but at his point I was waay to attached and couldn’t fathom parting! What does your contract say? 

ETA: I just want to mention that any problems considered GENETIC, an ethical breeder should compensate you for.

 

 

Post # 9
Member
2731 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014 - Disney

Unfortunatly this is the way it goes with pet ownership. I adopted a cat last year they offered to keep him until his eyes were fixed I took him knowing they were over run with other sick kitties. He had ulcers in his eyes which the rescue did not know about. I never blinked and just took care of him so we could save his vision. I accepted like a child this little ball of fuzz had to have his treatment and he was now my responsibility.

Post # 10
Member
441 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

I know it’s too late for this poor little puppy, but in general mixed-breed dogs have fewer genetic problems. Just a word of advice to anyone else considering adopting a fuzzy family member.

Post # 11
Member
156 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@dewingedpixie:  I can see what you mean, but things are different when you’re getting a pet from a breeder. Getting a pet from a breeder, you’re actually having quite a bit of say in your pets health, temperment, etc. An ethical breeder breeds to advance the breed, and this includes eliminating health concerns/ problems.

Post # 12
Member
2731 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014 - Disney

@Madelin:  I’ve bought 2 cats from breeders, and if I had not seen this little fuzz bucket on pet finder I would have purchased a third and had him shipped cross country. I was waiting on a litter for the fall. However I dont view my purchasing an animal as a business transaction but an adoption through love and when I saw his photo I knew he was meant to be my meow machine. When I met him the foster knew they even dropped the home inspection. It was an instantaneous acceptance between me and a cat that didnt trust anyone except the foster who had been working him over a month to gain what trust she had with him..

I am well aware of breeder’s policies however the breeder already did what they could offering to take the puppy and refund you. They are however not responsible for anything outside of that. I understand loving an animal and so do they but when it comes to something like this it becomes a business transaction. You either have to let go of your attachment and let it be a business transaction or face the fact that this is a living being and love it unconditionally which means taking care of it for its entire life. You cant have both an unfeeling business transaction and loving family relationship the saying is simple “you dont mix business with pleasure”. Your breeder did what was offered in the contract.

And yes I have taken an animal from a breeder in the past that was also considered difficult to home. He’d been rehomed twice because of his skittish behavoir when I took him. He really bloomed in our house because I had the time to make him into the breed he was, which the breeder never thought would have happened. I’m well known for taking the difficult cats actually and getting them to be very well adjusted and happy.

Post # 13
Member
7075 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@LauraJay:  That’s not necessarily true. It may seem like pure bred dogs have more health issues, but a lot of that is because it is much better documented and researched. Putting “mutt” into a study for hip dysplasia isn’t really going to tell you much obviously. And on the flip side, some mutts end up with the genetic issues from BOTH breeds.

Post # 14
Member
2546 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I don’t think you’re entitled to compensation. She offered to return it and return your money. You chose to keep the puppy. Now he’s your responsibility, vet fees and all.

Post # 15
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

@Westwood:  Agreed, a big study was just published by UC Davis about this.  While some genetic conditions do have higher prevalence in purebreds, about half of the ones they were looking at had no difference between mixed breed or purebred: http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=10613

I do think a lot of problems occurring in purebreds is because we have pushed the breeds too far to fit a certain look.  Can you be mad at your breeder because your pug needs airway surgery because of its smushed face?  Or your 2 pound teacup chihuahua broke its legs jumping off the couch?

This may be the first time this has happened in the breeders lines, or it may not be.  You can ask about health in the line and if previous owners had problems but they can lie.  A breeder can give you references but they may only give you names of people who had a positive expereince.  You can do everything you can to find a responsible breeder who is doing what they can to improve the breed, and everything looks good on paper, but they could still be breeding dogs they shouldn’t.  Like PPs said, it is essentially a roulette wheel.  That is why breeders put in their contract if you are unsatisfied with the health of the puppy you can return it for a replacement, but nothing more.

Post # 16
Member
1487 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I’m sorry your puppy is having problems. That said I think getting animals from breeders when there are so many homeless, unloved animals out there is sad. Your breeder may be ethical but there are plenty who aren’t. I wish the entire industry didn’t exist. We breed animals to our specifications and then inhumanely raise and slaughter other animals to feed them and yet we consider ourselves animal lovers. Sigh…

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