(Closed) How soon do you miss a period after conception?

posted 5 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 4
Member
622 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011 - Vandiver Inn

If your cycles are fairly regular, your initial due date is typically calculated off of the first day of your last mentrual period, not conception date. The reason being that most people don’t know exactly when they conceived.

It sounds like you just had a dating ultrasound, and your baby is measuring at 8 weeks and 2 days. Your due date may have been recalculated based on that. In which case it has nothing to do with your period or conception. It has to do with the way your baby is developing.

Post # 5
Member
881 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Usually, people calculate their estimated due dates based on the date of their last period.  However, if you have longer cycles or if you ovulated later the month you conceived, the actual will due will be different.  Sounds like this may be the case for you.  It is possible that you ovulated late your last cycle and that is when you conceived.  I ovulated on CD20 last month so 3 weeks into my cycle, and I know other have ovulated after 2 months or so and conceived so anything is possible.   Congrats on your pregnancy!

 

As for the part about skipping a period, you usually don’t get your period until after you ovulate.  So if you ovulated late, say 4 weeks into your cycle, you did not miss having a period, that period was just delayed and would have come roughly 2 weeks after you ovulated had you not conceived that cycle.

Post # 6
Member
1026 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@Mrs. Lox:  This is what I was going to say as well. Likely that it is just that they are dating based on size of baby but that is pretty inaccurate so early on.  It can be off by as much as a week without there being anything wrong.  Mine was off by a week as well and I know exactly when I ovulated.

But yes, if you did ovulate late in your cycle your period would be delayed because your luteal phase stays consistent. So whether you were pregnant or not, your period would not have come “on time” because of the late ovulation.  Then, of course, if the egg was fertilized, you wouldn’t get your period at all.  Hope that helps.

Post # 7
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@MrsB1015:  They go off the size of the baby in the ultrasound.  Determining when you are due by your LMP is not what they do, although the internet says it is- the reason being, everyone’s cycles are different AND babies follow their own timeline.

I was told something similar- that basically I would have conceived later than I think I did- but I just go with the due date they gave me and expect baby might come a little early.  I think it is better to have the EDD be a little later than you think it should be- because personally I think it is good to avoid being induced.

But yes- it is possible that particular cycle was just a longer one for you.  (In other words, it is possible that you ovulated later than usual that particular cycle.)

Post # 8
Member
1026 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@cbee:  Actually my doctor went by my LMP instead of the ultrasound. I guess it depends on the doctor.  They never actually come on your due date anyway so I guess a few days don’t matter much… 😉

Post # 10
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@travellingfool:  That’s what I am thinking!  🙂 

Post # 11
Member
492 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

It’s possible you ovulated late (and would’ve had your period late if you hadn’t been pregnant) – or maybe the ultrasound is off from when you conceived.  I was charting and I saw I ovulated 10 days late one month because I had a cold with a fever…any chance you were sick or under stress or were traveling during the week or two after your last period?

Post # 12
Member
881 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@MrsB1015:  Stress or being sick can delay ovulation.  Usually you will ovulate around the same time, but not usually on exactly the same day each cycle, more like within the same range.  The time from ovulation until your period arrives is your luteal phase length.  That stays pretty much constant throughout all of your cycles, although not everyone has the same length.  2 weeks is average I think, some are shorter, around 11 or 12 days, others may be more like 16 days.  It takes about 7-10 days though for a baby to implant after conception (and a few more days for the pregnancy hormone to build up) so you wouldn’t see a positive pregnancy test for at least that long.

Post # 14
Member
1026 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Yeah I didn’t always ovulate on the same day, but rather within a range.  The month after my wedding (when I started charting) I ovulated on cycle day 8 or 9 (very early) and that made my cycle really short that month.  The next month (when I got pregnant), I ovulated on cycle day 15 I think.  But your luteal phase (between ovulation and period) should stay basically the same.  When your period is a little early it is usually because you ovulated earlier that month and if it is a little late, it is because you ovulated a little later.  Unless you are one of the people who are always exactly the same number of days in your cycle.  Then you probably do ovulate on the same day each time.

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