How to find a good dog breeder?

posted 2 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
1049 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

cls9q:  Why wouldn’t they want to adopt? There are soooo many dogs out there that need homes that are in shelters. A lot of shelters (I know of a few locally) that eutheinize once a week regardless of if they need the room or not. It’s just so sad. I’m a dog lover.. so, when people ask for breeders it kinda rubs me the wrong way because there are soo many beautiful amazing animals that have recieved training and guidance by being in a shelter! I would DEF look into that before a Greeder. 

Post # 4
Member
1266 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

I am also someone who thinks they should at least look into adopting before going to a breeder.  If they want a Yorkie, there are breed-specific adoption groups out there.  Anyway, if they’re absolutely set on getting a puppy from someone who breeds, the first step is to look into their local AKC breed club.  Chances are there’s a Yorkie club near them.  They should have a website and they can email or call a club officer for recommendations. Don’t buy a dog from anyone who has multiple litters at once, isn’t interested in meeting you before letting you get the puppy, or is willing to put a puppy on a plane for you to pick up.  All of those are red flags that they care more about the money than anything else. They should also freely disclose the puppy’s lineage and any health problems on either side.  Almost every purebred will have some sort of problem in their lineage.<br /><br />For what it’s worth, my parents used to breed standard poodles just for the love of the breed and usually lost money on every litter.  I would still adopt.

Post # 6
Member
2720 posts
Sugar bee

Also, a good breeder will health test all their dogs, provide you with records, and provide a pedigree for their dogs. The best breeders I know breed for show prospects and not for money but charge a lot because you are getting a high quality dog. I would also avoid hobby breeders. 

Post # 7
Member
206 posts
Helper bee

cls9q:  We found ours on craigslist. There were a few sketchy ones…one guy said his male was in the pound and he hadn’t gone and got him yet. Another was obviously a scam.

The legit breeder we went to was really organized with the registration papers and had taken them to the vet for their first checkup at 6 weeks, along with the first set of shots, to make sure they were healthy. We went to her house to pick out our puppy and also got to meet both parents. We asked what she was feeding/weaning them with and it was a high quality puppy food brand (rather than the junk at walmart)

I doubt you’ll find a yorkie at a shelter. Most of the shelter dogs in my area (New Orleans) are pitbull mixes. 

Post # 8
Member
637 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2017 - Ceremony and Reception: Historic mansion on the water

Also, a good breeder will talk to you and understand your needs and what you can provide for a new puppy/dog.  Then they will point you to pups in the litter that have the most suitable personality.  Just because someone comes to a breeder for a dog shouldn’t mean that a breeder just places a dog with any and everyone.  Being a responsible and good breeder also means placing dogs with people they believe will be responsible owners.   So look for knowledgeable breeders who show interest in you as an owner and not just as a paycheck.

Post # 9
Member
3372 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2000

cls9q:  It wasn’t clear to me that “adoption” meant getting a shelter or rescue dog but I sort of figured it out from the context.

If suppose they want a puppy. Personally, I don’t like puppies. We’ve gotten all of our dogs as adults. Puppies require so much training, and they teeth and chew, and etc…So for me breeder retired dogs and breed rescue dogs work very well. My first bulldog was one we paid for, a couple hundred bucks. But I developed a lifelong freindship with that breeder, and after a few years they gave us dogs at no cost becuase they were “retiring” the dogs and need to find a good home.

With my mindset, the best kind of dog is a retired show dog. They are usually nicely behaved and trained, and are well socialized becuase they go in the car, stay in hotels, meet lots of dogs in the show ring, etc.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 2 months ago by  .
Post # 10
Member
1619 posts
Bumble bee

Go to a dog show.  Look up the yorkie section and look at the breeders listed in the catalog.   Before talking with the breeders, do some research and know what the breed health problems are.  then call some of the breeders you’ve found in the catalog.  See how open they are about discussing pros and cons of the breed.  See if you acn go to their home and meet mom (hard to know temprement without meeting her hard to know if they just have a good website and are actually a puppy mill unless you go to the location.) talk with them about health guarantees.  Ask about what happens if your parent’s cannot keep the dog.  Will they take it back for any or no reason for the life of the dog?  (Good breeders are committed to keeping their dogs out of shelters).  Good breeders often have waiting lists since they may have only 1 litter a year.  More and more good breeders are suggesting that pups stay with mom and the litter until a little later than previously (maybe until 10 weeks old) for socialization. 

Post # 11
Member
441 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

AKC Breed Club will always have a list of the approved Yorkie breeders who are reputable and have litters to better the breed rather than for money.

Post # 13
Member
2455 posts
Buzzing bee

cls9q:  No advice, buuuuut I just wanted to say I read that last post as your cat is a pterodactyl. Could be the wine though.

Post # 14
Member
703 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

amstudent1:  I’ve worked at an animal shelter for the last five years. We’ve adopted out every breed there is including a fair share of single breed dogs. Yorkies included. My toy poodle is from a shelter. The simple fact is that small breed dogs are adopted fast so while it may look like your local shelter only seems to have large dogs like pit bulls, chances are that’s not the case.

I couldn’t think of a worse place to find a reputable breeder than on a site like Craigslist. A breed specific club or the American Kennel Club is a far better place to source breeders. Reputable breeding is expensive. Most people do it for the love of the breed over making money. I know many great breeders who do extensive genetic testing, limit their litters, are prepared to take their dogs back for life if you can’t keep them and offer health guarantees. They have waiting lists for puppies. They don’t need to advertise on Craigslist. 

Post # 15
Member
703 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

cls9q:  Your cat reminds me of one we adopted out a few months ago named Frankie. I loved all his extra toes!

 

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