(Closed) How to make Jewish wedding programs?

posted 6 years ago in Jewish
Post # 3
Member
2580 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@Rugelach:  We ordered brochures on Vistaprint, actually! The kind they sell for promotional purposes. It was great and had just the right amount of space for all of our information about the traditions (we adapted most of the text from programs we had saved from friends’ Jewish weddings).

I know they also sell print-your-own programs will multiple pages (more like booklets) at craft stores like Michaels.

Post # 4
Member
526 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@MM423:  would love to see yours, if you don’t mind sharing. thanks!

Post # 5
Member
2580 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@LilDrAnya:  Sure! I tried to block out all of the names for the sake of privacy. It’s possible these photos are going to be enormous and I’m not sure if it’s readable…just warning you!

Post # 6
Member
1304 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I designed and printed ours myself.  I just bought cardstock that folded in half and made a template in MS Word.  When folded in half, there was a front cover, a back cover, and two inner pages.  The front cover had our names and the date and location.  The inside left listed the bridal party, and the inside right listed the order of the ceremony with a short description for each part.  The back page had a thank you message to our parents, another thank you to our family and friends, a “we remember” section for the groom’s father and others who are no longer with us, and our address.

Our wedding stationery was ivory with dark brown font.  The save-the-dates had a soft green dandelion puff, and the invitations had a mandarin orange poppy.  So, I printed our programs in dark brown on ivory paper, and then I bought a dandelion rubber stamp and a floral rubber stamp and alternated green and orange stamps on the cover to add some color.

ETA: Here’s a crummy iPhone photo.  I also blurred out the names etc.

Post # 7
Member
363 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@MM423:  That’s an awesome idea, thanks!

Post # 8
Member
2580 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@SquidWeds:  Sure! It was very no-fuss and super inexpensive. They run a lot of business promotions for free brochures, so I just kept an eye out for those and ordered a few batches. I just used one of their premade templates!

Post # 10
Member
216 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Microsoft Word actually has a template for Jewish Wedding programs that I’ve been playing around with. It’s an 8.5×11 folded in half so has front cover, back cover and inside. Front cover has our names, inside page 1 has wedding party, inside page 2 and back have explanation of traditions. I’ll probably end up importing it into Adobe illustrator to finalize the layout but I’m working on the text part in Word.

Post # 11
Member
526 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@MM423:  they’re beautiful!

Post # 12
Member
14 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: February 2013

I’m really glad this thread is here, I was worried I was the only one who would be trying to explain Jewish customs to my guests!  I converted to Judaism so neither of my parents’ families are Jewish, and my fiance’s mother was a convert so none of her family is Jewish, and my fiance’s father’s family is all deceased.  So aside from him, his mother, me, and the Rabbi, no one at our wedding will be Jewish or have the faintest idea what everything means.

I was thinking of just making up a booklet and having Office Depot or something print them up.  I feel pretty confident to be able to make it look nice.

Edit:
mtrl01 – Where did you get that MS Word template, I’m not seeing it anywhere…?  I’m curious to see what their explanations are. 

Post # 14
Member
16 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: November 2012

@jamiesaltkill:  I did exactly what you stated about Office Depot.  I found a site on line with regard to Jewish Wedding Traditions, I  edited to fit my needs, as we are not having a Orthodox ceremony.  Printed it on 8.5 x 11 it ran me just under $50.00 for 100 programs.  Just google Jewish Wedding Ceremonies, or something to that effect and you will find various documents thatexplain the traditions of the ceremony. 

http://www.mazelmoments.com/blog/jewish-wedding-tools-resources/jewish-wedding-traditions-customs-rituals/

 

Post # 15
Member
1 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: December 2012

Hello Jewish Brides!  I was just married in December and found very few program samples on-line.  I could not figure out how to post my actual template on wedding bee.com but if you PM me, I can send you it in WORD.  I used a tri-fold.  Below is the wording from my program.  I hope you find this helpful.  Mazel Tov!!

 

 

 

Wedding Processional

 

Officiants

Rabbi <Name>

Cantor <Name>

 

Parents of the Bride

<Name> and <Name>

 

Parents of the Groom

<Name> and <Name>

 

Grandmother of the Groom

<Name>

 

Matrons of Honor

<Name>

<Name>

 

Best Man

<Name>

 

Groomsmen

<Name>

<Name>

 

 

In lieu of favors, a donation has been

made to Ohev Shalom in support

of Celebrations, an education program for children with special needs and their families.

 

 

Wedding Ceremony

 

Badeken- The Veiling Ceremony

Just before the ceremony, Daniel will lower the veil over Michelle’s face.  The veil symbolizes modesty and conveys the lesson that however attractive physical appearances may be, it is the soul and character that withstand time.

 

Ketubah- The Marriage Contract

Prior to the ceremony, Michelle and Daniel will sign the Ketubah in the presence of their families, Rabbi Perlstein, and two witnesses.  The Ketubah will hang in their home as a reminder of this day and their commitment to each other.

 

Hakafot- Circling

While it is traditional for the bride to circle the groom, Michelle and Daniel will share in this ritual, demonstrating that their relationship is one of equal partnership, balance, and mutual respect. The circles represent the seven wedding blessings and days of creation, as well as the beginning of a new family circle.

 

Chuppah- The Wedding Canopy

The Chuppah symbolizes the new home that Michelle and Daniel will build together.  It is open on all sides to signify that friends and family will always be welcome.

 

Sheva Brachot- The Seven Blessings

The seven blessings are at the heart of the Jewish marriage ceremony.  The blessings consist of praise for God, a prayer for peace in Jerusalem, and good wishes for the couple.

 

The Breaking of the Glass

The ceremony concludes with Daniel breaking a glass under his foot.  The broken pieces of glass remind us that life is fragile and that even in times of great joy, we must not forget our people’s journey throughout history.

 

Yichud- Seclusion

Immediately after the ceremony, Michelle and Daniel will adjourn to a private room to reflect on the ceremony and share their first few moments as husband and wife together. 

 

 

To Our Guests

 

A Jewish wedding is not merely between two individuals, or their families and circle of friends; it is a cause of celebration for the entire Jewish people.  We are honored to share our rich traditions and customs with you on this day.  Thank you for being here and for your love, support, and friendship.

 

 

To Our Parents

 

We are both lucky to have grown up in homes filled with love, laughter and guidance. Your respective 44-years of marriage have served as shining examples for us throughout our lives.  Your commitment to each other and your families has shaped who we have become, what we believe, and our ability to look towards a wonderful future as husband and wife.  We cannot thank you enough for the happiness your devotion has afforded us.  We hope to return this happiness to you through our marriage on this day and always.

 

 

In Loving Memory of

Our Grandparents:

 

<Name>

<Name>

Post # 16
Member
3316 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

Our programs were set up as a Word document.  The front and back covers were made of 8.5″ x 11 inch ivory cardstock, scored so that it could be folded to form an 8.5″ x 6.5″ booklet, with the design on the front cover based on the design of our ketubah.  (The ketubah art was used with the consent of the artist, Amy Fagin of 20th Century Illuminations.)  Some acrylic jewels were used on the cover, to highlight the scrolls in the design. The first inside page was made of vellum.  It had a line drawing of our synagogue, which overlaid the first parchment page, so that the text on the parchment could be seen through the vellum.  The remaining pages were all parchment.  The program was held together using a ribbon that went between the center pages, and then was tied at the back of the program.  A word document with the entire text of our program can be found at this link.

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