How to work a sump pump?

posted 3 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
1287 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

MrsGatito:  As I know it, in our older-ish home with a sump pump, it works itself…meaning, there is nothing we physically need to do with it, because it pumps water back into our sewer drain, or main water line (via a pipe), in the event the ground is too saturated, etc.  

The only thing I would recommend, and maybe since it is a new house it was already thought of for you, would be to check to see or add the battery back-up (which there are kits at your local hardware shop that would walk thru this ‘simple’ process).  This was, if the power goes out, it will still do what it needs to do!!

(Pardon my less than stellar terminology),  but all my homes have always had them, and they were never really ‘dealt with!’.

 

Post # 4
Member
2893 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

If your sub-pump is in a well (ie a hole in your floor) it should drain its self directly to your sewer. People who have a hose out to the lawn are probably actually had their basement flooded and are using some sort of back up external pump to pump out thier basement.

It should automatically kick on on its own as long as it has power. It kind of works how the tank of your toilet works. It has a ball and float mechnism that is attached to it that will kick in when the water raises to a certain level. If you want to make sure it is working, lift up the float, and it should start running. I would watch the well around it the first couple good rains you get, and make sure the water level doesn’t seem to get to high. I also will just randomly check my basement for wet spots as mine is partially finished. I go to each corner bare foot, and put my foot down to check if the carpet seems wet.

I would also suggest the battery back up. The only reason we don’t have one on ours is because we have owned our home for 2 years including through a year of floods and two years of ridiculous snow falls and our power has flickered twice (meaning we don’t have power outages, as we are very close to the main city grid, so we get fixed first.)

Post # 7
Member
298 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

MrsGatito:  We have a hose running from our sump pit out our window because we had a freeze in the drain line which caused a block and the water was coming back into the pit. Our house is new and the drain line wasn’t buried deep enough in the ground so it froze. From what my husband has told me this is a temporary fix until he can bury the line deeper so it doesn’t freeze anymore.

The battery back up suggestions are great! Also another suggestion is to have a second pump on hand in case the first one burns up. My husband is a little paranoid and we have two extras. In case it goes out and your basement is flooding it’s less time spent trying to find a replacement.

Post # 9
Member
2893 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

The hose in the ground goes should go to the sewer.

Post # 10
Member
7098 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

If your pipe is underground then it should go out to the storm sewer. That is what our house has. You should not have to do anything to the sump unless it malfuntions and stops working, in which case I’d call a plumber.

Not all houses have the connection to the storm sewer (our old house did not) so that is why some houses have the hose leading away from the home. I’m not sure why your neighbor would disconnect theirs, unless they were having issues with flooding or perhaps the pipe is collapsed.

Post # 11
Member
4828 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

MrsGatito:  Our house was built in 1941 and thankfully the woman who owned it before us put in a sump pump. We don’t have a long hose, but we do sit on a hill and have a short hose so it just goes down the hill. I’m sure the hose is because you don’t really want water near your foundation. that’s the whole point of a sump pump. There are underground pipes (don’t know the proper terms) that water will seep into and when the pump gets full, it drains it out of your house instead of flooding your house.

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