(Closed) How would you summarize the ‘theme’ of Catholocim?

posted 8 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
5263 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

Well the root of it is “universal” – as in, unlike certain religions, it doesn’t just apply to a “chosen” set of people who are born of certain lineage. Most of the things that I come up with – like you said, forgiveness for the concept of an original sin, etc – apply to all Christian religions, so I suppose it depends on who you’re explaining it to. 

Post # 5
Member
875 posts
Busy bee

I’m not Catholic… but I am a believer in Christ…and very good friends with lots of Catholics… and I think that I’d define our mutual Christian faith as being about LOVE.  “For God so loved the world that he gave us his only son.  That who so ever believes in him shall not perish but be saved.”  It is God’s great love for us that he allows us to be forgiven.  It is through God’s love for us that we are blessed by the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  It is as unusual for a Protestant child to be baptised and not taught the Gospel as it is for a Catholic child… and prehaps even more so… because many branches of the Protestant church believe that people should choose to be baptised and will not baptise infants.  So I think that you should consider talking with him about your faith and belief in the Almighty God just as you would a non believer.  You may have a far greater understanding than he does… so share your knowledge! 

Post # 6
Member
2641 posts
Sugar bee

It sounds like he is more lost than simply summing up any religion with a theme.  I think you might want to start with some history,  Tell him basic bible stories.  Tell him about the life of Jesus.  Then you can launch into Catholicism from there.

Post # 7
Member
98 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

for me–catholicism is all about community.  a lot of people see the “traditional” elements and the formality of the mass as a negative thing, but i think its really beautiful.  I find it comforting that my ancestors, people across the world, billions of people throughout space and time have spoken the same prayers and experienced the same gifts that I do every sunday.  You can go to a mass anywhere in the world and, regardless of the language, you can understand and follow along. Secondly, catholicism is all about discovering truth.  I appreciate a church that is able to admit (though often very belatedly) that it is wrong.  the catholic church is very embracing of science–it’s even beginning its own search for intelligent life in the universe!  We’re certainly not perfect (anyone who has watched the news lately knows that), but we’re always moving closer toward truth and rightness, and that gives me hope.

Post # 9
Member
2867 posts
Sugar bee

I was baptized and raised as a protestant. Then last Easter 2009, took RCIA and made my profession of faith and received the Eucharist.

I think the biggest difference between protestants and Catholics is the personal relationship vs. the community.  Catholicism puts a lot of emphasis on sacred tradition and community worship, hence the call backs.  Sacraments are done as a community–even confession, b/c you’re not only seeking forgiveness to God but also to the Church.  As a protestant, there is a huge emphasis on an individual’s personal relationship with Christ.

I guess the theme would ultimately be Love.  This is the most important aspect of Christianity.  To love even the person you dislike the most, showing charity, recognizing human dignity, and compassion.

Hopefully I didn’t sound too preachy…

Post # 10
Member
1403 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Catholicism in general has a few aspects that I think identify it among other Christian denominations.  (Some of these are common to other denominations as well.)

– It isn’t enough just to believe in Christ to be “saved” – you also have to live the lifestyle that Jesus outlined for us.

– The eucharist really does turn into Christ’s body under the blessing of the priest, so when we take communion we are participating in a weekly sacrament of forgiveness.

– What’s morally okay is NOT dependent on society, it’s dependent on Jesus’s teachings.  Many people argue that the Catholic lifestyle just doesn’t work for today’s society (like the Catholic stance on abortion, divorse, cohabitation before marriage, etc).  That’s because Catholic beliefs are based solely on what Jesus taught and not on what’s “popular” in society.

I guess to sum it up, the “theme” of Catholicism is an unchanging dedication to the moral truths that have always existed, those truths being Christ’s love for anyone willing to accept his forgiveness and live out his teachings in action.

Post # 11
Member
6010 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I would agree with the previous posters who mentioned the strong connection between Catholicism and community.  I grew up in a Protestant household, and converted to Catholicism on Easter, 2008.  The thing that really drew me towards the Catholic church is the emphasis and importance of community in our spirituality.  Other people are not simply our companions/friends/family, they are direct reflections of God, and connecting to other human beings is one of the strongest connections we can make to God in our daily lives.  Mass isn’t just a series of movements; it’s a community performing symbolic actions together as one.  Unity is such a strong theme in Catholicism, and it’s comforting and beautiful to me to know that I am a part of something bigger than myself.

I first started learning about Catholicism almost four years before I converted.  Even though i had a background in Christianity, it took me a while to learn about the church and to discover how closely my beliefs already aligned with Catholic teachings.  My best advice is to be patient; give your Fi lots of time to ask questions, learn about the religion, and make decisions on his own as to how Catholicism fits into his life.  Even though it would be great if right now he could say, “I want to join you at Mass because it’s important to me,” he might not be there yet.  I think it’s wonderful that he wants to go to Mass with you, even if at this point he’s doing it for you and not for his own growth.  Just remember that it takes a while, and that the learning experience is a journey.  And the more often you discuss your feelings, understandings, and knowledge about Catholicism, the easier it will be for him to discover how Catholicism fits into his life.  🙂  Good luck!

Post # 12
Member
5263 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

@jenbrandner – actually, communion is a sacrament in many Protestant churches as well. Some denominations see it figuratively, but many still see it as literal. 

Post # 13
Member
1403 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@lilyfaith – Yes, I’m aware.  🙂

Post # 14
Member
631 posts
Busy bee

forgiveness, community, etc…. these are important, but to me, the theme is Jesus.  his life, his teachings, his sacrifice on the cross for the redemption of the world.

Post # 15
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

I just wanted to add a few thoughts to the great summaries that people have presented here.

Catholicism for me was about social justice. I remember in 4th grade having to memorize the Beatitudes and what an impact that made on me.  I am from a farming community and remember all the hard work that our nuns and priests did on behalf of migrant farm workers in the community.

I went to several protestant churches in my late teens/early 20’s but never have found the same commitment to the least among us as in the Catholic Church (and Judaism too!)

Post # 16
Member
344 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

The theme?

Sacramental grace

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