HR bees: why would an employer be against hiring from within ?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
3677 posts
Sugar bee

Depends on the company, of course, but sometimes it just disturbs office politics too much. When you change work roles, it changes inter-office relationships, and sometimes that can cause problems. It’s more common with promotions, where a former peer now has authority over colleagues, than it is with lateral moves, but confidentiality could also be an issue, depending.

Post # 4
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

If the skill set exists, I always hire from within. If it doesn’t, I look elsewhere.

Post # 7
Member
2441 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

These are all reasons I have heard for people not hiring within:

– Not qualified
– Overqualified
– Really good at your current job and they don’t want you to leave it
– Personal commitments that maybe the new manager/department doesn’t want
– Office politics

Since you mentioned confidentiality, that could be a huge reason why they would not want to hire within. You might already have developed relationships at work and they are uncomfortable with you being in a confidential position once you know everyone already. Sometimes it makes more sense to hire externally for those kinds of positions.

Post # 8
Member
9137 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@mseagles: Ditto office politics.  Also, instead of just hiring one person, now they have to go through the process of hiring two.  Always broach the subject of a lateral move with your current boss before applying and interviewing for another job within the company.  It gives your boss a chance to know what is going on instead of them being blindsided by it when the office gossip gets back to them.  My big boss just sent out a memo in this exact subject letting employees know that if he is not aware of other positions we are applying for and he gets called, he is unable to provide a positive reference.

Post # 9
Member
4367 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Skill set/talent and salary would be a couple things I can think of. Even if you are laterally moving your salary as an incumbent might be higher than what they can offer a newbie. Thus not having to disturb your department & saving some (short term, who knows what the new persons retention and performance rating will be) money. It’s a very complicated, strategic thing… Talent acquisition and there’s literally like 100 reasons recruiters and managers do certain things.

Post # 10
Member
4367 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@beachbride1216:  That doesn’t sound legally defensible, especially if you have years of performance ratings that say otherwise. Hope that was approved by HR.

Post # 11
Member
5192 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

Hmm, depends on the company and on the manager.  Here are some possibilities:

1) They are interested, but internal politics make internal transfers difficult.  This is a really shitty reason not to do a transfer, but in some companies it’s reality.  To assess your situation, look around to see who’s been internally transfered.  Many people, or hardly any?  Also, have a lot of people been internally trnasfered out of your department specifically?  If not, it might show that your VP/manager is a jerk about letting people go.

2) It’s possible they aren’t interested in having you in the position, but are not being honest about it.  

3) The job being posted on Monster might mean that they are interested in internal candidates, but want to put them up against external candidtaes as well, and choose the person with the best fit.  Or it might mean they have no intention of hiring an internal…you never know,.

Post # 13
Member
6026 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

Some companies put restrictions on internal transfers if some of their teams are very young. They want the existing talent to stay in place a while longer to help finish building knowledge and procedures before risking losing that talent to another internal team.

Post # 14
Member
9137 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@deetroitwhat:  So long as he doesn’t give an unfounded negative review, he’s insulated.  It’s only if he gives a negative review which he is unlikely to do since he’s an attorney and knows emplyoment law better than I do.  He basically said he wouldn’t give any kind of reference if called on a job reference he wasn’t notified about.  It’s fair but only because it takes months to get an approval to replace people in my current position; my application and interviewing process took approximately 3 months from the time the job was posted until they secured the funding for it.

Thankfully it had nothing to do with me.  I plan to notify him if I get an interview following the FSOT test I am taking in the fall.  It takes 6-9 months to get an FSO position so it would give him plenty of notice of my intent and my request for a positive reference.

Post # 16
Member
10384 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

New blood is an important part of keeping ideas and innovation moving forward. That may have factored in. Or, politics.

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