HR/Nurse Bees – Need Advice! (Long!)

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
29 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I know someone who teaches in communications. He has a doctorate and he told me that most universities want to hire people who have graduated from other schools. They rarely hire from their own programs. I’m not sure if nursing is the same though. Are you wanting to teach at the same place you’re going to school? You should ask about this.

I’m an RN, but I don’t know about what universities are looking for when it comes to hiring professors. I would think that the longer you work somewhere the better, but most places understand if you had to move for your husbands job. That’s different than leaving just because you don’t like your job.

Post # 4
Member
31 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I don’t think changing your job early on due to relocating would/should affect how a hospital views you. However, unless I read your post wrong, you are planning to teach in the next 2 years, right? I’m a RN working on my masters, and working in a Teaching hospital- and I haven’t encountered many (if any) professors with less than 5-10 years actual ‘nursing experience.’ I know you mentioned clinical instruction- which is a great option, I felt I was able to learn along with my students because I was a relatively new nurse at the time with only 3-4 years experience. With the job market down in the dumps for nurses lately, I would just try to be mindful that in nursing, experience is key- and while leaving a job for whatever reason happens, maintaining a working environment as a nurse for a reasonable amount of time will improve your credibility and knowledge as an instructor/professor. Having a couple of jobs in a couple of years on your resume doesnt mean you wont do well, you may find working in different hospitals garners you different experiences and learning opportunities. Just be honest at interviews about your situation. You have amazing goals, and good luck with them! The world of nursing is in desperate need for more educators- you sound like you have a passion for it:)

Post # 5
Member
5544 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

I’m a new nurse who wants to go into teaching too. I haven’t gotten to talk with current profs like I would like,  but the general thing I get is most schools don’t hire their own grads as teachers. I work a floor now,  am looking at getting into our infusion center to do chemo stuff and then maybe dialysis and home dialysis teaching, then a masters. A few years of experience in different places isn’t bad,  you didn’t jump from one hospital to the next in a couple months,  many of my profs had a few years in this,  a few years in that,  until they decided what they wanted to do. Though I am curious what the general conscious is on how long one needs to be in practice before being a clinical instructor/ adjunct prof. 

Post # 6
Member
181 posts
Blushing bee

I dont know what  the current economy for newish nurses in Iowa is, but if you post this on the general nursing section of allnurses.com I’m sure you will get a ton of responses from nurses who have good advice.

 

i am in a area of the country where it is extremely difficult for all nurses to get a job, so if I were you I would move halfway in between the two jobs and each of you can have a hour commute. But, Iowa is probably vefind different than the state I live in.

 

 

 

Post # 8
Member
31 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2014

I’m not sure about that, I was thinking more of classes like medical surgical classes where the lecture professors usually have some years under their belts. But… A class like ‘Intro to Nursing’ would probably require less experience and allow for a professor/lecturer who is passionate about teaching and being a nurse. Sometimes it helps students relate (the ‘tradional’ 18-22 age) when they have someone they feel could relate to them. You can always work your way up- and a lot of professors I’ve had maintained a per diem or part time nursing job. That way you stay relevant while teaching. Good luck!! 🙂

Post # 8
Member
58 posts
Worker bee

Hi, I realize this is an old thread but I am curious as to what the OP decided! I am from Iowa, specifically Des Moines, and although I currently live on the east coast I am contemplating moving home and starting nursing school. (I have a BA in English from University of Iowa already) I was curious as to what you know about the hospitals in Des Moines or the outlook on the job market in Iowa in general? And do you enjoy nursing? 

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