Huge salary jumps?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
1500 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@ChicFoodist:  I’m not sure how it works in Canada, but your salary will be determined not just by the position title, but also by your experience. if they believe you have the sufficient experience for the role, they will pay accordingly, but if they see you more as a junior hire (and were hoping to hire someone more experienced), they may pay less. 

You will need to do your research to understand what a person with your # of years of experience would receive in a similar role with similar responsibilities. Basically, the number you give them is not what you’re making now, but what the market would offer for a person like you, in a similar industry, similar position. Hope this helps!

Post # 6
Member
3223 posts
Sugar bee

@ChicFoodist:  I would tell them that you researched the salaries at the level and understand that the starting salary for that level was XXXXXXX and that you think you deserve either the starting because you don’t have experience at that level or more because of x,y,z reason.

Post # 7
Member
920 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

I think you have more wiggle room to negotiate especially because you already work there. So I think you would be okay to do so! Especially since you did your research. You should definitely sell your multilingualism and experience to get to the salary level you want to be at. I wouldn’t take the lower offer and ask them to promise me a review and raise in a few months. Those are never guaranteed. Like you said, you should expect to make at least the minimum for that position! I think that’s totally fair. 

A got a new job with a new company recently, and the salary offer was 30% more than I previously made. I didn’t negotiate at all because it was a great offer for my age and experience, and I would feel uncomfortable or greedy doing so. 

Also, did your research pertain to your specific geographic area? I know that makes a huge difference in salaries. 

Post # 9
Member
3223 posts
Sugar bee

@ChicFoodist:  It’s just an opening spot in negotiations.  You can adjust up or down from there.

 

Post # 10
Member
1768 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I work in HR…so. I mean, whatever. I don’t claim to be an expert on these things, but it is what I do for a living.

We recently had a position open that we had targeted at 70-80k, based on experience (so a pretty big range). We ended up hiring two people, one of which had the slightly less than the basic experience needed (person A), and one who had a ton of experience and could be seen as overqualified (person B).

It was a big move up for person A, and this person said they were looking for 60k when we asked them about salary. We offered person A 68k, because we felt like she deserved it, was mildly underqualified but showed excellent potiential and as a company we were willing to overcompensate her at the beginning of her employment to get her to stick around.

Person B, on the other hand, we offered 90k.

As an aside, it is one of my biggest pet peeves when candidates tell me “Well, I looked this position up and it should pay xyz”. I’ve done a lot of research online from what the internet says position X should make versus what we actually pay and they RARELY match, or are even close (and I’ve worked in the nonprofit industry in the Midwest and the for-profit industry on the East coast). You should always be asking for a salary based on YOUR skills and qualifications, not what the internet says it should be.

If they call you up and make you an offer, I would negotiate based on your skills, but know that you’re negotiating salary for a position that you admit is a big jump for you. I would caution you against negotiating too hard because you “know” the minimum for the position – you don’t want to start off on a bad foot, and they likely aren’t going to pay you the typical minimum for the position if you’re underqualified (even minimally so).

Post # 11
Member
1500 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Yes i completely agree. I would redefine the lowball. If you have 100% of what they are looking for and they do not give the minimum of the job, then they are lowballing. However, from your posts it does sound like you have less experience for the job, so I do not expect you will get the higher range. You should go in confident with a number that is suited for how much experience you have, not what the title should be.

Post # 14
Member
746 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@ChicFoodist:  Ask for whatever the position is worth. I AlWAYS negotiate..and I always get more money. Women especially are notorious for not negotiating their salary and end up making less then men. Get out there and get your piece of the pie!

Post # 15
Member
1067 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

@irishphoenix:  +1000000!

 

I was bumped up the ladder at my current place of employment unexpectedly when my supervisor decided to leave the company.  I was offered her spot, with a new title (better than the one she left vacant), and a halfway decent salary increase before I could really process the fact that she was leaving. I threw back a number at them that was a good 10% more than they offered me in the first place, and they green lighted it without batting an eye.

Post # 16
Member
746 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@ANGELaaimt:  Yes Ma’am. I flipped my salary 40k in 3 years. Know your worth ladies!

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