Hypothyroid blood test question

posted 2 years ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
4216 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

No. But once your thyroid levels even out you shouldn’t need them as frequently. 

Post # 3
Member
128 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

I can tell you as an endcorinologist, it seems weird that it should cost that much, it’s a fairly standard test, any chance there was an error in the bill? As a general rule, in the beginning you have to check more frequently to get to the right dose of the medication, but once it’s controlled, you can check less frequently, I have patients that are well-controlled that I only check every 6 months. Also, it depends what tests the doctor is sending, hypothyroidism could be monitored with just a TSH level, that one blood teset really should not cost that much. I would check in with your doctor and your insurance about the cost, that feels like way too much. I had my thyroid function tested with my MD and it cost $20 including all of the other standard blood tests.

Post # 4
Member
42472 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

That seems like an outrageous amount for a blood test. Have you tried phoning around to different labs to see what they charge?Are you restricted to certain labs because of your insurance coverage?

Your doctor orders the test. He doesn’t decide where you get it done.

Post # 5
Member
87 posts
Worker bee

I work in a lab and the price for a TSH level is $67. Next time ask for the script to get the blood work done and call around to labs and ask them for pricing. If you live in the phila county, bucks county, or Delaware county in pennsylvania you can look up atlantic diagnostic lab and that will be ur price unless you have insurance then we would just bill the insurance. 

Post # 6
Member
894 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Thyroid tests cost a lot; I get them pretty frequently (Thyca). However, your insurance should cover it. My Tg, TSH, T3, and T4 is often in the $400+ range before insurance. I’d call your insurance and ask. Maybe you went to a lab they don’t cover, or you have a deductible that hasn’t been met yet…stuff like that can mess things up. 

Fwiw, my OOP expenses are not usually very high.  $10-$20 usually if the Tg test isn’t included. 

Eta – that high price might be the “asking” price (someone fill in the right term haha!) but not the negotiated price. For ex, the lab might charge $400 but have an agreement that they’ll take $10 from you and $100 from your insurance and call it a deal. 

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 4 months ago by  .
Post # 7
Member
1710 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

I agree with PP, that it is likely a lab that your insurance is not in network. For example, my BCBS will be in-network with DLO but not Labcorp

Post # 8
Member
1136 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

mrscali13:  Eek where do you live? I’m assuming the US? I was tested for hypothyroidism about 2 months ago and it cost nothing! Admittedly we have a very good health care system here, but that astounds me! I wouldn’t be able to afford it either!

Post # 10
Member
184 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

mrscali13:  I think it depends on your insurance and how much they pay. The last batch of tests I had (where my endocrinologist also tested for other vitamin deficiencies and things like that) and before insurance it was like $900. I thikn I still had to pay $200.

Post # 11
Member
4216 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

FFS. don’t let them get away with only testing TSH. That’s half assed doctoring. I lost so much hair while they ignored my T3 and TaB omg. I went untreated for years because of this outdated method of only using TSH as a marker. Shop around but really your health should be the priority. 

Post # 12
Member
128 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

HappySky7:  sorry, as an endocrinologist, I have to disagree with  you, the research really doesn’t back up the idea of replacing T3 in addition to T4, as your body naturally converts T4 to T3. I’m not sure what you are referring to with TaB, if you mean thyroglobulin antibodies or thyroid peroxidase antibodies, these are markers for autoimmune thyroid disease, but do not in themselves cause symptoms, there is no medical way to treat the antibodies, they are only used to diagnose, and to monitor disease activity. For hypothyroidism, TSH is often enough, especially if you are trying to be economical.

Post # 13
Member
4216 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

medgirlny:  I highly doubt that you’re an endocrinologist given the fact that you spelled it incorrectly in your first post. Not everyone properly converts T4 to T3, which an endo would know. Knowledge of autoimmune disease is integral to proper treatment. Does this patient have Hashimotos? Or is there another cause? Knowledge of the underlying cause of the hypothyroidism is integral to proper patient care. Doctors who blindly prescribe synthroid and only monitor one marker are quite frankly, a disgrace. Thankfully my endocrinologist and GP are up to date on their information. Cytomel gave me back my quality of life after being ignored by several doctors who said “oh but your labs say you’re fine”. As for antibodies not causing symptoms, I disagree from personal experience. Few doctors bother to test TaB unfortunately, so I guess there will never be a definitive answer to long as so many of them follow 50 year old treatment guidelines. 

Post # 14
Member
128 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

HappySky7:  Sorry, just wanted to voice my opinion, didn’t mean to offend.

Post # 15
Member
4216 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

 

medgirlny:  Not offended. I am an advocate for proper patient care and I am particularly passionate about thyroid disease. 

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