Hypothyroidism?

posted 3 years ago in The Lounge
  • poll: Do you have hypothyroidism?
    No, but I know someone who does : (21 votes)
    34 %
    No, and I don't know anyone who does : (8 votes)
    13 %
    Yes : (32 votes)
    52 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    3598 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2011

    I had blood work last year that showed me right on the borderline for it.  But my doctor doesn’t think that my symptoms are severe enough to put my on levothyroxine just yet because I’ll then be on it for the rest of my life.

    Do you also have deficiencies in vitamins B12 and D?

     

    Post # 5
    Member
    222 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2010 - Christmas Tree Farm

    I have Hashimoto’s, which causes my hypothyroidism. I also have a physically larger than normal thyroid, so I have to have ultrasounds every six months to watch for growth and nodules (I had three at my last ultrasound, but none of them appear to be cancerous). I’ve been taking medication (levothyroxine) to maintain my hormone levels for about five years now.

    Post # 7
    Member
    179 posts
    Blushing bee

    I was just diagnosed with hashimotos a little over a year ago. My blood levels were always “normal” so doctors didn’t want to believe my symptoms…. Until they discovered lumps all over my thyroid and the ridiculous antibody count. 

    I actually take synthroid instead of the generic because levothyroxine made my skin breakout like I was a teenager again!

    I have been told cutting back on gluten helps alleviate some of the symptoms (At least for hashis) because the antibodies that attack the thyroid are the same makeup as the ones that attack the intenstines in celiac disease. 

    Post # 8
    Member
    222 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2010 - Christmas Tree Farm

    @TeeBee25:  I finally found a doctor who paid enough attention to my symptoms to figure out that’s what it was. My enlarged thyroid became obvious when I was about 10 but no one bothered to look into it because I’m thin, so they didn’t expect me to have hypothyroidism. I started seeing a naturopath a little over five years ago, and she’s the one who finally put all the pieces together. 

    The funniest part is that H’s grandpa is a doctor (he’s 84, so he’s retired), and after about ten minutes of us talking he looked at me and said, “Have you ever heard of Hashimoto’s? Because I’m pretty sure you have it.” I laughed and told him it took ten years for me to get the diagnosis he figured out in ten minutes.

    Post # 9
    Member
    222 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2010 - Christmas Tree Farm

    @Heatherliak:  My doctor told me the same thing about the gluten. She said that whether you’re gluten intolerant or not, if you have Hashimoto’s your body is going to have an inflammatory response to gluten so you’ll feel better if you avoid it.

    Post # 10
    Member
    3756 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: April 2014

    Borderline Hypo and was put on levothyroxine to get the number down as we’re TTC with one miscarriage. I stopped taking it though because I started having really bad heart palpitations and stomach pains. Both went away within a couple weeks of stopping it. I am on a gf diet for Crohn’s disease and it helps with lots of other autoimmune issues, I think they’re all related anyway. I haven’t been sticking to my diet and have gained weight and believe that’s what’s causing the elevated TSH level. Hoping to bring it back down naturally with a whole foods diet, no gluten, no dairy, low sugar.

    Post # 12
    Member
    222 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2010 - Christmas Tree Farm

    @TeeBee25:  I’m glad to hear that you had an easier time getting diagnosed than I did! 

    Post # 14
    Member
    3756 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: April 2014

    @TeeBee25:  I’m sure there is, but I’m kind of anti meds if I can avoid them. I was on meds for the Crohn’s at first too and the side effects were miserable. These are two autoimmune diseases that have no known “cure” just medication to keep them in check. I have found that I can keep my health in check on my own with dietary modifications and so have many others (google autoimmune paleo, autoimmune gluten, autoimmune diet change, etc). Don’t get me wrong, I believe that traditional medicine plays a role in our lives and I don’t shun it if I absolutely need it, but in this case I would rather bust my butt eating well and taking care of myself then dealing with nasty side effects.

    Post # 16
    Member
    2134 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: June 2015

    Both my mom and grandmother have hypothyrodism, so I probably will too, one day. My mom’s is a lot worse – she had the exact opposite while growing up (a very overactive thyroid), and after she had kids, it just switched. She’s been on medication for years and years, and continues to struggle with losing weight. She’s not fat by any means, but no matter how well she eats or how much she exercises, she never loses more than a couple of pounds (and then just gains it back). It’s tough for her, I think, but again, hers is really severe.

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