I got 99 problems, and more money would solve at least 67 of them.

posted 3 years ago in Married Life
Post # 3
Member
420 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

When it rains, it pours. Once you save up a little money, something would come up. Hang in there though, things will get better. 

Post # 4
Member
646 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Yikes. Sorry things suck so much. On the bright side, I think you can improve things if you can make a strict budget and stick to it! You said you don’t want advice so I won’t say more than that. I hope things get better!

Post # 6
Member
7271 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

Not here to give advice, just wanted to say I’m in the we need more money boat too, and it sucks! 🙁

Post # 7
Member
1327 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

They say money can’t buy happiness, but it sure doesn’t hurt.  Keep your head up though!  I’m on a super tight budget (aka I’m broke), and when I plan out my budget each month I just don’t know how I can possibly do it.  But somehow it always works out.  Being broke sucks.  A lot.  But I think things will get better.

Post # 8
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@MrsTillerResq:  Consider consolidating your debt into one affordable payment. Did you have a home inspection? There is no real recourse, but it should have outlined what was wrong with your house so you could have an idea of how much work/money would be involved to bringing it up to your standards. If you skipped this step or used a crappy inspector, I would definitely recommend finding a better one next time.

Do as many of the repairs yourself as you can (FI renos all our properties from top to bottom), but don’t do something unless you actuall know how or you risk making it worse. Cut out the small things – buying coffee, going out for lunch at work, etc. Those small things add up and can help pay for stuff you do need.

Post # 9
Member
7531 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

I can commiserate.  We’ve had fixer-uppers.  If it’s available somewhere watch “Money Pit”.  I think Tom Hanks and Shelly Long starred in it.  Sendng virtual hugs.  Hang in there!

Post # 10
Member
8426 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@MrsTillerResq:  Will your homeowner’s insurance help cover the cost of the leak?  We had flooding in our house just after our wedding (literally the monday after our wedding) which caused around $10k in damage.  Luckily, we got some help from our insurance policy.  Also, depending on the APR/balance of your credit cards, you might end up saving money/paying things off faster with a home equity loan for debt consolidation.  Hopefully things will start getting better for you and your husband, and good luck on his job hunt.

Post # 12
Member
8426 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@MrsTillerResq:  Just for referrence, our policy went up by $62/yr after filing our claim (we use statefarm), however if your policy doesn’t cover water damage and it isn’t severe there’s not much point in filing a claim.  Depending on how much you put down on your home, I think most banks will let you borrow up to 80% of your home’s value (including the first mortgage).  You could also look into a personal loan from a credit union (large banks don’t seem to have good % rates on these), I know my husband’s credit union offers personal loans at 4.99%.  I would definitely look into different options (i.e. negotiating down debt, filing taxes differently, etc) and hopefully you can find something that works for you guys.

Post # 13
Member
712 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

Why did you and your husband buy a house that you couldn’t afford? I am not trying to be snarky; I genuinely do not understand. I hope you are not offended. Wouldn’t it have made more sense to waut until you could actually afford a mortgage and repairs?

I thought it might be useful to offer a different perspective. It is best to live within your means so that you do not have to be stressed out.

Post # 14
Member
3756 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

We’re trying to pay down debt, save for our wedding, a mortgage, and a baby, and it seems like every other day there is some other pop up expense to pay for. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve fixed my car in the past year, and it’s not even old. I hate the damn thing. It never ends, does it?! I’m sorry you’re going through it too. It sucks!!

Post # 15
Member
3756 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

@creativeplannertobee:  Love that movie!! I also will never buy a “fixer-upper” because of this movie, and the fact that FI is NOT handy what-so-ever and the things that need to be fixed will be broken forever. 

Post # 16
Member
10384 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Every person I know who has bought a fixer-upper has had catastrauphic issues almost immediately.

Emptying one’s savings to “get a great deal” on a home that is also a fixer upper is setting yourself up for failure. The very nature of a fixer upper in that you can expect to pour a ton of money into repairs….thus you need a cash cushion for that.

I’m not trying to lecture you, OP, but am trying to make it clear to other posters that may be considering the same type of home purchase – literally 100% of the people I know who have done this have spend tens of thousands on repairs in their first year, and it was ALWAYS way more than they were expecting based on the inspection before buying.

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