i guess i'm moving to Turkey?

posted 4 weeks ago in International
Post # 2
Member
612 posts
Busy bee

Ru skyping with foreigners working there or with local teachers? I’d suggest u try to find out from both sides of things. Perhaps ask about how easy to learn the local language and is English a widely spoken language? Also find out about healthcare system and services, and places to live, transportation system, potential for you as his wife to work and if you have children, schools..

I’ve got an indian friend residing in kuwait with her family. She was born there since her parents moved there to work. She seems happy there though she did mention eventually you’d have to leave that country.

All the best! Xxx

Post # 3
Member
200 posts
Helper bee

Just adding that I worked in an IB school and I 100% the program, but it is usually a little more work for the teachers than other typical privates.

Post # 5
Member
1432 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2017

I think you’re doing the right thing reaching out to other teachers there.

What are your hobbies? How easy is it to transplant them? How do you exercise? Will that be possible there?

Post # 7
Member
1291 posts
Bumble bee

 

tinneranne2 :   You are aware of the ongoing internal and external political upheavals, I assume. I personally wouldn’t go to Turkey in the current(political) climate there. You’d have to be prepared for instability (Erdogan Protests, arrests of journalists and foreigners and current attacks on the Syria/ Kurds) All of this does not make the country attractive to me personally. 

Post # 8
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: April 2017

Hi, I live in Turkey! And can maybe answer some of your questions/ease your concerns. 

As far as safety: I feel 100% safe here, and I live in a smaller more religiously conservative place. I came to Turkey as a single woman and even then I felt safe – both on a local level (like walking around and going to places on my own) and on a governmental level. Yes, the government is unstable, but America honestly feels pretty similar to that at the moment. I think western media and people who have never traveled here tend to paint the middle east as super scary, but it’s never felt like that to me. 

If you have any quetions, I’m happy to answer! 

Post # 9
Member
10579 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

 

tinneranne2 :  I had a close friend who lived in Turkey for years and loved it. I mean, she loved it so much she wanted to move there permanently. But the concerns raised by Shesaidyes :  are on my mind.

The U.S. government (for what it’s worth right now, which might be nothing) says to reconsider travel to Turkey right now (note: there was fighting back and forth started by the US under Trump)

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories/turkey-travel-advisory.html

Australian gov agrees

http://smartraveller.gov.au/Countries/europe/southern/Pages/turkey.aspx

The NYT asked a senior intelligence analyst: 

But although Turkey does have a continued threat of terrorism, it shouldn’t be an off-limits destination, said Jim Duck, a senior intelligence analyst for iJet International, a travel intelligence firm based in Annapolis, Md. “If you already have a visa or are otherwise eligible to visit Turkey, the country is largely safe and poses no greater risk than travel to many other parts of the world,” he said. However, Mr. Duck added that Turkey’s southeastern provinces, especially those along the Turkey-Syria border, should be avoided because of significant security concerns.

 

Post # 10
Member
1291 posts
Bumble bee

sarahbah :  you obviously have a much better feel for thesitustion than I do, so it’s great you chimed in. For perspective: I live in Germany, not in the states and the political instability (not even considering the Syrian issue) is something we talk of often. The upraisings two summers ago are still very fresh in everyone’s mind. I do think it may be a very different thing to be living in your own country where you are a citizen during political instability rather than in a foreign country where you may not speak the language or have connections. Also, again you would understand the complex political situation in Turkey better than I but I am still a little shocked that you would compare a real and actual government putsch aattempt with the current situation in the US. (Which is thankfully still far from a group of leaders trying  to remove a president forcefully from his office whether deserved or not) 

 

ETA: I do think Turkey is an amazing place to live and visit. This is in no way a critism of the country or culture , rather my point is it is there are some sgnificant security concerns. My perspective is not that of a westerner with an outdated and fantastical view of the Middle East. On the contrary Germany, as you probably know has very intimate (though politically challenging) ties with Turkey. I am not trying to be an alarmist. I am just cautious and critical.

Post # 11
Member
612 posts
Busy bee

tinneranne2 :  since you don’t have children, one less worry. Perhaps adding learning local language as part of your chores? Homemaker has the most work to do! I salute you! Guess my two main questions tend to surround the roof over my head and healthcare system. And safety. But nowhere in 100% safe so yeah.. tarsus sounds like an interesting place to live. Keep us updated! X

Post # 12
Member
8322 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

tinneranne2 :  I don’t have anything to add to what pp’s have covered but can maybe add about the vegetarian/vegan question. I didn’t find it any harder than China to find vegetarian food. Whilst the Turks love their meat, they also love their vegies. You just need to be aware of hidden meat (like stocks) but that is the same in any country. For example the lentil soup is most often made with meat stock.

At times it was hard, especially out of major cities but not impossible at all and I had more issues avoiding sugar (T1 diabetic) whilst trying to be polite to the overwhelming hospitality from locals. It really is a great place and definitely one of the favourite places I have visited.

Here is a website I found doing a quick google search which has some key words for being vego.

https://www.neverendingvoyage.com/vegetarian-food-turkey/

 

Post # 14
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: April 2017

– Things I normally bring to TK: books or a kindle, cooking spices like pumpkin pie blend, garlic and onion powder, and chili powder, underwear and bras, any holiday decorations

-Things I wished I’d known: figuring out how to do life without the little conviences in America, like not having a clothes dryer or garbage disposal, no recycling. My husband and I don’t have a car, so having to take the bus to get groceries. It sounds like you’re pretty familiar with this while living in China, so it may not be a big transition for you. 

– As far as integrating into the culture, Turks especially in the south are super warm and hospitable. This means that they will probably come up to you and ask you lots of questions about yourself. You’ll find yourself invited for tea right away. What I know about people in the Tarsus area is that most are “secular” meaning not quite as religious as some areas. This helps when it comes to being a foreigner as they are generally more open. There also tons of expat online forums, maybe you’ve already looked into them, that will answer lots of questions too (MerhabaForums is one).

-Other advice: I asked my husband this question (he’s Iranian) and his advice was to bargain for everything when shopping – every price is negotiable 😉 . My advice would be to continue to do your research and talk with people who are living in Turkey. It will help ease any understandable concerns you may have. Turkish culture is so warm and hospitable. I really, really enjoy it here. It is a beautiful country with lots of amazing history.  

Post # 15
Member
4 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: April 2017

Shesaidyes :  Sorry, yes, to compare Turkey’s government to America’s was a big jump. I think I just get frustrated when people (like relatives and some friends) see Turkey as some crazy, unstable place with bombs going off on every street corner – especially when America seems to be experiencing things like school shootings every few days (and other crazy happenings). Turkey really is a beautiful country with a rich culture and history. I wish more people could see that. I didn’t at all intend for my comment to be directly related to yours. I apprecaiate your insight as well. 

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