(Closed) I have a grown up job interview, uhm, help?!

posted 8 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

Congratulations!

What, specifically, makes you nervous? 

Post # 4
Member
355 posts
Helper bee

There is a book called something like the “first 100 days”, was recommended by a friend to another friend that was in a new job and managing people for the first time.

Post # 5
Member
1260 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Don’t second guess yourself! You have the knowledge, and it takes just as much skill to manage in the retail setting than an office setting – you just need to apply those examples to the job you have applied for. That is all they are looking for. They already think you must have talent because you were offered an interview! Now you just need to show them you are the best for the job. Think of some possible questions you might be asked and prepare some answers to them so you are not caught completely offguard. Have examples ready about when you solved conflict, delegated work, leadership, and worked well as a team. That is half the battle!

Post # 6
Member
1566 posts
Bumble bee

Some general interview tips that helped me in the process last year were: 

– Come prepared with concrete examples of how you handled difficult issues in prior jobs. “Tell me about a time you…” questions are common and hard to answer without prep

– Have a friend do a mock interview for you – this helped me so much.

– You need to convince them that you’re the best person for the job, and you can’t do that if you don’t believe it yourself. It sounds like you have management experience, albeit in a different environment, that definitely qualifies you for this position. So don’t wonder whether you can do well in this new job or not, but just assume that you can and focus on how to convince the interviewer of this.

Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
1347 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

You could also come up with some of your “weaknesses” (perhaps whatever you’re nervous about?) and have some ideas on how you are going to work on those weaknesses. You’ll be great!

Post # 8
Bee
13714 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2009 - Barr Mansion

My advice:  suit up!  No such thing as being overdressed for an interview.

Post # 9
Member
2205 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

Definitely dress up, and I used a couple of website to prepare answers for questions, or at least get comfortable with my responses to interview questions.

A lot of employers no a days are using behavioral interviewing type questions which ask for specific examples of your exemplified a certain trait in a previous work situation, so try to be prepared with lots of examples of previous experience managing people.

Good luck!

Post # 10
Member
1701 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Definitely do some research on the company ahead of time, so that you can prepare questions to ask them when they ask you “Do you have any questions for us?”

Asking them questions makes you seem more interested in the job, and if you ask them something based on something you had to research, they will be more impressed because they know you have prepared.

Just for example, an interview I had at a newspaper once. I saw on their website through some link or something that they had recently been bought out by another company. This is a very successful paper (or was at the time) so I asked something along the lines of how the recent purchase would change things at the paper, if they thought it would make them even more successful, etc. etc.

Post # 11
Member
4385 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

My best advice: Wear a suit. First impressions are important and this will definitely give off the management material vibe.

Post # 12
Member
979 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I always make a list of common questions or questions that I anticipate they might ask and then I go over each question and formulate different answer strategies.  So if the interviewer seems to have a focus on achievements I can use my achievement line of answers.  Or if they seem to have a focus on teamwork I can pull out my answers that related to that.  These are not memorized responses or anything, just more like outlines to help me remember what I want to say so I don’t stumble.  I always go over these answers outloud in the days before the interview and that morning, usually while in the shower.  🙂

Post # 14
Member
2398 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

Even if there is something unexpected, it won’t be anything you can’t handle.

They called you, so clearly you’ve got the skills and the experience they’re looking for.  A curveball question is just an opportunity to showcase how your abilities are unique, but still an asset.

Post # 15
Member
1045 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2008

Good luck!

Sounds like you’ve gotten a lot of great advice.  Just remember to breathe, and that they wouldn’t have granted you the interview if they didn’t already think you’d be a suitable fit for their requirements.

Get a good night’s sleep.  Bring a bottle of water if you can fit one in your purse, so you can have a sip while you’re in the waiting room, if you get nervous dry mouth.  Wear something that makes you feel powerful, but not fidgety.  Don’t wear too much jewelry that you’ll feel the urge to pull on, adjust, etc.

Don’t feel the need to fill every available scrap of silence– keep your answers thoughtful, but simple.  If you don’t know the answer to one of the questions, don’t feel the need to make something up– just tell them that you’ll look into it and let them know the next day.  Come prepared with some questions to ask them, as well.

Follow up with a hand-written thank you note, sent on the same day as your interview, or the next morning.  In the note, answer any small questions that were still outstanding, if you had to check on anything for the questions your interviewer asked.

Also: once they offer you the job, please NEGOTIATE your salary!  I don’t care if it’s more than you’ve ever made before.  Ask for more.  They can always turn you down, but chances are, they will increase their offer by a bit.  Studies show that women miss out on a lot of available money over their careers because they a. don’t negotiate their starting salary, and b. don’t ask for raises.  If you don’t ask, you don’t get!

The topic ‘I have a grown up job interview, uhm, help?!’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors