I have an inclusion in my ruby ring – help?

posted 3 years ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
169 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

TakeMeBack:  all natural gems have inclusions, it’s what makes them natural rather than lab created. I’m not aware of any treatments,  but I embrace the “fingerprint” of my ruby, to me it’s not a flaw, it’s what makes it unique. Inclusions 

in mine stand out more when it needs a clean, so keeping it sparkling can help keep the inclusion in the background.

Post # 4
Member
169 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

TakeMeBack:  I tend to mostly get it cleaned by the jeweller (custom engagement ring comes with lifetime cleaning)

Post # 5
Member
18 posts
Newbee

Can the inclusion be hidden with a prong? Maybe you can just have it reset to be hidden with a prong as much as possible. I would highly suggest against heat treating your Ruby, although it is very common for Ruby’s to be heat treated if not done correctly it can cause your Ruby to crack or fracture. 

Post # 7
Member
3222 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

TakeMeBack:  Can you go back to your jeweller and see if s/he will allow you to upgrade your ring? Perhaps the jeweller can bring in a few round cut rubies for you to look at and choose from to be set into your ring.

Post # 9
Member
1473 posts
Bumble bee

I noticed an inclusion in my diamond shortly after getting engaged. At first it annoyed me a bit. It’s all I could see. But now, I actually like it. It makes it unique. I had to take my ring in to get the prongs tightened a few months ago and when I got it back the first thing I checked was for the inclusion – that way I know it didn’t get swapped with a similar stone or something. (I’m crazy, I know). 

But I do ilke it. I see it as a little freckle.

No one is going to notice your ring except you. I think you’ll eventually get use to it.

Post # 10
Member
3222 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

TakeMeBack:  yeah, you can have another jeweller work on your ring unless that voids its original warranty.

The difference would be that a jeweller you didn’t purchase your ring from will likely not uprade your ring by crediting the amount you’ve already spent towards the new stone/ring. You would be asking them to bring in some different jewels to look at (which is usually free of charge), but then you’d need to purchase the ruby, and pay them to remove your current center store to replace with the new, inclusion-free one.

Depending on where you ordered your ring online, they may also have an upgrade policy. If you purchased it recently, you may also be within the window to exchange it. I know that when I ordered a moissanite, I asked the company to handpick one with the least greenish tint, and they were happy to oblige. You can always ask for an exchange for a different ruby, one where the inclusions can be hidden under a prong.

Post # 11
Member
1843 posts
Buzzing bee

There are other treatments available. Beryllium is being used but…

I’d only do it if you don’t mind losing your stone. As pp said it can crack. And if yours was already heat treated it might complicate things. There is a big difference in basic low heat treatment and heating a stone almost to the melting point. If you bought online my guess is you probably don’t have further information on the gem? Who cut it, exactly how it was treated etc?

Also, even if you are willing to risk the gem, then comes the real problem. Many of the stones are treated as rough. Before there is a lot of value and a cust

 

Post # 12
Member
1843 posts
Buzzing bee

There are other treatments available. Beryllium is being used but…

I’d only do it if you don’t mind losing your stone. As pp said it can crack. And if yours was already heat treated it might complicate things. There is a big difference in basic low heat treatment and heating a stone almost to the melting point. If you bought online my guess is you probably don’t have further information on the gem? Who cut it, exactly how it was treated etc?

Also, even if you are willing to risk the gem, then comes the real problem. Many of the stones are treated as rough. Before there is a lot of value and a customer to respond to. For example, most cutters are not doing re cutting work anymore. They do it only for members of the trade. Which means they’ll understand and accept the risks and also have special insurance to cover for any potential loss without asking the lapidarist (cutter) to pay for it. Finding someone to be willing to treat your stone and deal with the liability might prove very challenging. 

I’d try to love the gem for what it is. Imperfect? Yes. But it is better to have a ruby and be able to actually see imperfections than have a super treated gem that is so dark that you can’t even see inside of it! There are lots like that in the commercial market. Girl, you have one of the rarest gems in the world as of now. Rock it. 😉 

Post # 13
Member
1843 posts
Buzzing bee

Sorry for the double post -.- . It cut the message

Post # 14
Member
2731 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014 - Disney

I have an untreated sapphire which is the same as a ruby. It is graded as “Eye Clean” but I can see 3 clear rutile crystals at the right angle and one comes to the top at one of the facets. No one else sees them. It doesnt bother me I think its awesome that my stone has another crystal in it :).

Natural stones typically have inclusions. Even treating them cant melt them all out. The only way to avoid that is to buy a lab stone and even then you can still get inclusions.

The inclusions are actually one of the ways they prove the stone is natural. My stone magnified you can see the silk which shows it has not been treated at all. I think thats pretty cool, and it was something I asked for.

 

Post # 15
Member
279 posts
Helper bee

Can you try to photograph it? That might help us. I don’t think heating it again will help, though.

Leave a comment


Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Find Amazing Vendors