I want to give up the rat race…crazy??

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
491 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

I would honestly be too scared to do something like that. I had a couple of friends quit their jobs to go back to school full time for masters degrees in education and it didn’t work out so well. One in still unemployed and one is working in a non-teaching job. If they offer night classes or something, that would be a great option. I’m working full time and going to school part time. A one year program has taken 4+ years but it was so worth hanging onto my job.

Post # 4
Member
1466 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@missjewels:  I think you should do what you want! It’s too bad your parents feel like they wasted their money but that was their choice and just because they made that choice doesn’t mean that you have to stay in a job you don’t like. I do realize that’s really hard in the face of your parents being unsupportive.

But you FI is supportive! You were there for him this whole time and now you deserve the chance to experiment and figure out your life. This is the time to do it, not later when you have kids (if you are planning on that). And it sounds like you will still be financially secure with FI working. 

You get one life. What are you going to do, listen to what other people say, or listen to yourself?

Post # 5
Member
1340 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@missjewels:  I think it makes a lot of sense to do that, but part-time, at least for now. Have a money backup job. Maybe that is the bookkeeping business. 

The trick to being self-employed doing something you love is to make sure you don;t ruin it for yourself by letting the money problem get to you. So it’s best to have backup plans.

Good luck!

Post # 6
Member
2546 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I would absolutely do it. Especially if your fiance makes good money and you can land on your feet. 

Fear is an awful emotion. Don’t let it control you, and don’t ever ever ever shoot for mediocrity. If you love to bake, making a living off of it is smart and pleasurable.

 

GO FOR IT!

Post # 7
Member
2546 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@BruinBeeMPH:  two stories of a completely different field don’t have anything to do with that situation. and for thatmattr, if it did, my husband is also back at school getting a masters in education and he already had two awesome teaching jobs, while still at college

Post # 8
Member
2546 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@nawella:  +1! live the dream. a lot of people who don’t live theirs will tell you that it is too risky. don’t let them ruin it for you.

 

Post # 9
Member
1315 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

You weren’t allowed to look into college, isn’t that the same as university? Or are you from out of the US 🙂

It’s not like you want to quit your job blindly to follow your dream. You have a practical plan to make it happen that includes getting additional training and experience.

I would go for it! If you fail, so what – At least you failed trying to make your life look like what you wanted it to be, instead of “succeeding” in being something you didn’t want.

Post # 10
Member
491 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

@bebero:  she asked for opinions, I gave her mine.

Post # 12
Member
2394 posts
Buzzing bee

If you have a good plan, a little bit of talent and a willingness to work hard, you can do anything.

Look at Kelsey Nixon. An average, ordinary girl from Utah who followed her dream and now has her own cooking show. Look at Ree Drummond, aka “The Pioneer Woman.” A housewife on a ranch in the middle of nowhere in Oklahoma, and she transformed her cooking blog into best-selling cookbooks and a TV show. Imagine if they had decided to play it safe and not take a chance.

Do what you love and the money will follow. 

I’m not saying that if you go to baking school for a year you’ll have your own cooking show and make millions of dollars. I just mean — you’re way too young to not at least TRY to follow your dream. Do have a good solid plan that is grounded in reality — have a plan B and a plan C and get advice from experts and professionals to prevent yourself from making common mistakes. Go for it. 

Trust me — bookkeeping will ALWAYS be there for you if the baking doesn’t work out. 

Post # 13
Member
9949 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

@BruinBeeMPH:  The problem with that is that people aren’t putting money and resources into education, so there aren’t jobs.  That’s not a bad decision on your friends’ parts…it’s that the government SUCKS.  

 

@missjewels:  Did you go to college or not?  I am confused by what you meant.  What is your current profession?  I think it’s fine to take on something new, something scary and fun, as long as you have a good back-up plan.  Can you work part-time while in baking school?

Post # 14
Member
98 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

My two cents:  Do not leave your job.  Do the baking course part time (at night or on weenends).  Once you are done with your baking course, then consider the options: finding a new job, becoming a professional baker, having your own bakery business, or stay in the job you are at.

 

 

Post # 15
Member
2299 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@missjewels:  I’ve been there. I got my university degree straight out of high school because my parents insisted. College was not an option. Now, I’m finishing up a college diploma… so after spending 4 years and a ton of money in university, I’m 25 and finishing a 3 year college program, financing it on my own and coming out with a ton of debt. If I had just been allowed to do what I wanted in the first place…. sigh.

Seriously, go for it. Do what makes you happy. You cannot be stuck in a job that you hate for the rest of your life just to keep up appearances. You parents will get over it (mine did!).

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