Inclusions on magnified image of stone. Help!

posted 2 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
2891 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

gisekaotic: Ask the fine folks at pricescope. They are diamond nerds to the nth degree — what’s the cert on this stone? The ASET? The Idealscope image? Measurements, any flourescence? They will be able to help you out. 

If this is GIA or AGS, you should be fine, as these are the strictest labs but in terms of if this is a great deal or not, they will be able to help 🙂

Post # 4
Member
273 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I have a ex ex ex E vs2 h&a and my stone has a feather, you honestly can’t see it.  And even with it magnified you can’t really see it, unless you have a jewellers professional loupe. 

Post # 6
Member
56 posts
Worker bee

Ask that question on Pricescope’s RockyTalky forum here before you do anything.

 

 

Post # 7
Member
3637 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

Pricescope is most certainly the forum to head to and ask. But I agree with playdohpants: , you should not be able to see inclusions in a VS1 unless magnified 10x, and even then it is meant to be hard to see them. Double check with the people at Pricescope to make sure this actually is a good deal because if they are seeking as a VS1 and it isn’t one, you could save a lot more money by calling them on it (if the inclusions would not bother you.)

Also, I know that some types of inclusions can weaken the stone so that a knock at the right angle on a hard surface is more likely to lead to chipping. Just make sure you factor that into your decision. Of course if the stone is to be bezel set and not set in claws, this would be less of a concern. 

Post # 8
Member
450 posts
Helper bee

Dont touch it with a barge pole!  inclusions in a vs1 are impossible to see with the naked eye so there is no way that the pic you posted is a vs1 stone.  

Post # 9
Member
1517 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

I have never heard of getting such a VS1 large stone (2.62 ct) at less than 19K. I would be extremely suspicious.

Post # 10
Member
124 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Which lab certified it? That is the all important question. All labs are not created equal. That price is really low. If something seems too good to be true it normally is. I am a pricescope member and a huge diamond nerd. Where are you getting this stone? A reputable dealer? Is there an ASET or idealascope image to better judge the light performance near the inclusions?

Post # 11
Member
2214 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 1987

 

Koalaclark:  But the photo is a magnification.  It isn’t what would be seen with the naked eye.

Post # 12
Member
2661 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Have you seen it in person?  I would want to see it myself and look at it and see how it looks to the naked eye. 

Post # 13
Member
2214 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 1987

 

gisekaotic:  I wouldn’t expect to see any of these small flaws in the diamond when viewed with the naked eye.  However, if you have any worries then have the diamond posted to you for approval.  If you like it you can then send it back to be set.  If you don’t like it just send it back.  This way you will be sure that you have made the right decision.  I imagine that diamond will be sent to you by Fedex and fully insured against postal loss (check this).  You will have to put it on home insurance for the time that it is in your house.  When you send it back it will have to be Fedex fully insured.  I’m sure that the online diamond merchants will give you details of what to do.  (Make sure that you follow them to the letter.)

In fact anyone spending nearly $19K on a diamond should see it in person before they buy it.  After all, one wouldn’t buy a $19K car without test-driving it. 

Actually having a diamond with flaws visible under magnification is a good thing.  If you have any alterations in your setting or ring repairs you can always check that the diamond is your diamond.  You are also wise to think of such flaws as fingerprints giving uniqueness to the stone rather than as simply flaws.

Post # 15
Member
2214 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 1987

Good call.  Both GIA and AGS are very stringent in their grading.  

But do consider looking at different stones and comparing them.  Some excellent cuts are more sparkly than others.

 

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