Infant Potty Training

posted 3 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
5542 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

Meh… I am extremely doubtful. That young the kid can’t control their own bowel or bladder function. It isnt part of their physiology yet. What it is is mom and dad are trained not the infant.

Post # 4
Member
1392 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

An infant bladder can only hold so much…I can’t see how they could use one to two diapers a day. I am 29 years old and I pee more than twice a day. 

Post # 5
Member
577 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@globalmargaret:  I do this. I started at 5 months and my daughter is 1 year old now. It’s very hard and requires constant vigilance, but I wholeheartedly believe in it for many reasons and I would do it again.

When we started, we used cloth prefold diapers at home so I could easily feel when she peed. My daughter never really gave “signs” of having to pee so I paid close attention to how often she peed throughout the day (e.g. 90 minutes after the first feeding, then 15 minutes after that, then 20 minutes after that, then 30 minutes after that… repeated throughout the day) and held her over the toilet or sink and made the “ssssss” sound when it was almost time for her to pee. She caught on right away but we still had a lot of misses. 

By 8 months she was doing most of her pees and poops in the potty, staying dry for about half the day. But then she started crawling, and “forgot” how to go the the potty which is common. I got her back on track but with more misses than before, and she regressed again when she started walking. (And when she started eating solids, which changed her poop drastically.) It’s normal to have regressions and also “strikes” when she refuses to sit on the potty. The strikes will pass.

I use sign language with my daughter and use the sign for “bathroom” every time I take her potty. She has used the sign sometimes when she has to go, but most of the time I still have to rely on timing and intuition to know when to take her. Other moms I know just offer lots of opportunities, like taking their child to the potty every 30 minutes throughout the day.

The other moms I know who have done EC have had similar experiences. Don’t go into it expecting that your child is going to be potty-trained at a young age, or will be able to stop wearing diapers by age 1. But if you want to do it in order to use fewer diapers, become more in tune with your child, help them to learn awareness of their body and needs, teach them to learn pottying gradually instead of suddenly, then I would definitely recommend it.

There’s so much more I could say about it, so ask if there’s anything else you want to know!

Post # 6
Member
577 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@chasesgirl:  It’s not about teaching them to hold their bladder. It’s about learning to predict when they will need to go (and later teaching them to communicate when they need to go), and giving them an opportunity to do it in a potty instead of in a diaper.

 

Post # 8
Member
577 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@globalmargaret:  You’re welcome! You can also do it part-time instead of full-time. That’s kind of what I’m doing now, I’ve become more relaxed about wanting to catch every single pee and poop. And actually I found that when I became more relaxed about it, my baby became more responsive.

4 months is a good time to start. I started a little on the late side, and 6 months is the latest because after that they become too easily distractable. With my next baby I plan to start at 3 or 4 months.

Post # 9
Member
5542 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

@caritas:  Like I said, it is training the parents not the kid 

Post # 10
Member
577 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@chasesgirl:  A lot of people call it that, and I’m fine with it. I don’t claim that my daughter is “potty trained”, but she pees and poops in the potty, which is good enough for me. I know EC (“elimination communication”) is not for everybody and requires a lot of time and a certain personality to do it. I’m not saying that everyone should do EC or that it’s the best way, but it’s the best way for many people and I think it’s valid and valuable. 

There are a lot of things we do for infants while they are still learning the skills they need. I fed my infant before she could feed herself and I wipe her mouth when she’s done eating, and I put clothes on her because she can’t do it herself. So I’m fine with holding her over the toilet when she has to go. 

I grew up in a culture where EC is the norm. I think it’s strange to ignore a child’s elimination processes and only respond after the fact (by changing diapers) until age 2 or 3, when suddenly a whole new set of skills is taught in a short period of time. (And especially at an age when they are most resistant to change.) For an infant to learn to recognize the urges to go and the steps involved in doing so is a series of skills that they can be exposed to over a period of time and from a young age. Some kids take to it faster than others, but if it can save me some tantrums and meltdowns because the potty has been a normal part of my baby’s life instead of this sudden new thing, I’ll take it!

Post # 11
Member
509 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@chasesgirl:  I predict you’ll get some flack but kudos for saing it like it is.

From what ive seen and according to many modern western studies, very early EC can lead to regressive and obsessive behavior in children when not done properly. Like utopia, its great in theory but not so much in practice.  Its all about what works for you. In some cultures,  moms have the luxury of monitoring their children for EC cues. Unfortunately in the western world where moms share childcare duties with others, its not so practical. 

Above all else, dont force babies into EC before they are ready, it can have long lasting physical and psychological repercussions.

But if you are doing it and it works, kudos to you too. Consider yourself lucky to be able to “know”your child so well…most working moms would probably envy you that.

Post # 13
Member
11668 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@caritas:  how is holding baby over a sink to go to the bathroom teaching thema skill they will use in the future Though? I don’t know about you but I don’t go to the bathroom in the sink…

Post # 14
Member
577 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@MrsWBS:  That’s only in the beginning and gets them used to the sensation of releasing on cue. Then you hold them over a potty, then they sit on the potty themselves. Also when you are at the sink, baby can look in the mirror and look down at herself and see what she’s doing, which they are very curious about, instead of being covered by a diaper all the time.

I started by holding my daughter over the sink but a lot of people skip that and just start right on potty. I found that my daughter was more responsive when she could watch herself peeing in the mirror. From there it was easy to transition to a potty, or a child insert on the toilet.

Post # 15
Member
3213 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2012 - Catholic Church

@caritas:  These tips are very helpful and I’m reading that blog you posted now too. I’m very interested in EC, at least for part-time. My husband expressed interest in it too without me ever bringing it up! Though he didn’t have a name for it but had read an article about how babies in some cultures are trained to go on cue rather than wearing diapers.

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