Is everything negotiable in a job offer?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
2441 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

It never hurts to try!

Post # 4
Member
3633 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Depends really on a number of factors. You can certainly ask but some companies are just more conservative than others in terms of perks and benefits. For example, at our company, the PTO accrual is set; it’s actually in the handbook. It’s entirely based on how long you’ve worked here and there’s no negotiating on that.

However, take working from home. There’s no official corporate policy for this (at my company) and it is at the discretion of your manager. Some managers would not be okay with telecommuting whereas some managers (e.g. mine) would be fine with it as long as it doesn’t interfere with productivity and I’m available to come in for in-person meetings and projects at any time.

As for 401k contributions, I doubt you can negotiate that (at least in terms of matching). That’s usually a set company policy and not at the discretion of HR and the hiring manager.

Post # 5
Member
5192 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

It never hurts to try.  They will have things that they can’t or wont change, but you have a lot more leverage when they are offering you a job than you do at raise time.  Trust me, I’m in HR.  See if you can get yourself moved up to the enxt level for vacation, or see if you can get extra money to make up for the loss in 401K.  Maybe you’ll get turned down, but you wont get anything extra if you don’t ask.

Post # 6
Member
1662 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

Definitely ask for some extra vacation time! They can’t say yes if you don’t ask!

Extra vacation time is a concession some companies will make because it doesn’t cost them money per say.

Post # 7
Member
3570 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

If it were me, I wouldn’t ask for more time off.  I would just be happy I got a job offer.   If you wanted more money, that might be different.   

Post # 8
Member
926 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

The vacation time is defintely negotiable!  I don’t think the 401K, health care, or holidays are… they are company wide policies and the company would have to get everyone on the same page.  I wouldn’t give up a great vacation policy like the vacation and sick time combined and use it how you please (we have the same policy).  I almost would consider giving up a few vacation days just to minimize my commute (I abhor mine too), but you should prioritize what’s more important to your new job. 

Post # 10
Member
1340 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@kmarie719:  Unless the position is specified under a union contract, everything is negotiable. Basically, if they want you bad enough, they’ll make the move worth your while.

Definitely ask for more paid time off and cite the additional costs of insurance and worse 401k as reasons for asking for more PTO. Explain that you are taking a hit on both so you need to be compensated in other ways. You are not interested in a lateral move.

You can negotiate a better match on 401k, by the way. An employee handbook never set anything in stone for a company.

 

Post # 11
Member
3538 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Probably not, but it doesn’t hurt to ask.

At my job, we accrue our vacation time monthly.  The rate that you accrue it is dependent upon how long you’ve been employed at the company.  

Post # 12
Member
1340 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@MrsTVLover:  The mentality of so many women refusing to negotiate their compensation is one of the chief reasons why women are paid less than men, FYI

Top of the list of things I will teach my future daughters: hardcore negotiation tactics, step by step!

 

Post # 14
Member
7075 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I try to make the best possible impression on a brand new job, so I personally wouldn’t go in immediately asking for more days off. I just don’t think “hey I generally use every single day of PTO for vacation, so can I have a few more in case I get sick” really sets the tone for a good reliable employee (obviously I realize you wouldn’t word it like that). That’s just my opinion. The benefits there sound pretty average to me.

Post # 15
Member
1340 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@Westwood:  The way to word it is to frame it as compensation, which it is, and is completely reasonable to negotiate. Seriously, who doesn’t want more time off of work? Employers know employees want this.

I don’t think it looks bad at all because they are in negotiations. It would only look bad if she asked for more vacation time after she accepted the position and started.

In negotiations, everything is on the table! And if you don’t ask for it, you’ll never get it!

 

Post # 16
Member
3635 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Everything is negotiable!  Start with pay, then benefits.  Vacation time is a HUGE benefit!  I’d have a really hard time giving up all my vacation.  (We all get 6 personal, then I have 18 vacation, plus 1 extra every year).  It sounds greedy to say I won’t leave for less than 20 days of vacation, but that’s what I’ll have here in 2 years…

Believe that you’re worth more.  I just read an article that said if the salary you ask for doesn’t make you blush a little, you aren’t asking for enough.  They offered you the job – they want you.  95% of the time they leave room in an offer for negotaition.  Maybe not if it’s an hourly skilled trade.  But benefits like vacation days, signing bonuses, fuel allowances, company cars – you can negotiate all of that.

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