Is it better to leave a job or get fired?

posted 2 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
1377 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

Either way, in future interviews, you’ll have to explain why you left that job, whether you were fired for some reason or left. Personally, I think you might be better able to explain it away if you left rather than explaining why you got fired. 

Post # 3
Member
213 posts
Helper bee

tynakinnon:  I don’t know where you live, but I think in most states you can’t get unemployment if you quit. 

Post # 4
Member
415 posts
Helper bee

Yak:   you also can’t get unemployment if you’re fired.

 

Post # 5
Member
2111 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

 

tynakinnon:  That depends. Do you actually mean fired (Something you’ve said or done is leading to your termination) or being laid off (company can’t keep you for reasons outside of your control)? If you’re being fired, it’s better to quit. If you’re being laid off, I’d say wait it out until it’s official. No one would see it as a mark against you to be laid off in this economy. It happens. As long as you’re a good employee, it won’t reflect poorly on you. Being terminated, however, will. As long as you have a decent explanation and can demonstrate that whatever caused it is no longer an issue, you may be alright. I think it’d be better to quit and explain that the position wasn’t a good fit for you to future employers than say you were a problem employee they had to terminate. Either way, do everything you can to have something lined up before changing jobs. Even if they call your current job for a reference, most companies have a policy where they will only verify that you worked there and when, not giving the reason for you leaving or talk about your performance. It opens them up to too much risk of legal action. 

If you could give more details, I may be able to give better advice. 

Post # 6
Member
746 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I think it depends on your financial situation and how quickly you can secure another job.<br /><br />If you get fired because your boss is a dick and doesnt like the color of your hair, you can collect unemployment.  If you get fired because you are habitually late or absent without medical reason or you’ve done terrible things and your employer has documented proof of discipline, then you probably won’t qualify for unemployment.<br /><br />Unless you’ve done something terrible, i think most “firings” can be explained.  You’d just need to explain it in an interview so when references are checked, they aren’t caught by surprise.

Post # 7
Member
5285 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 2009 - New York, NY

JazzyGirl85: It depends on the reason you’re fired and how adamant is that employer on not allowing you to get it.  I saw 2 cases where someone that was fired not only was awarded unemployment, but the employer was ordered to offer the job back.

In another case the employer did not attend an appeal and unemployment was awarded.

Post # 8
Member
5285 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 2009 - New York, NY

tynakinnon:  As PP posted, either way you will need to explain why you left or were fired from that job.   I conduct new hire interviews and we definitely ask about gaps in employment and about the reasons for leaving/getting fired.  Very recently we discualified a candidate because her body language and vague responses were indicating she was not giving an honest answer about why she left a job and she also had a gap in her employment history and did not give a satisfactory reason for it.  Your financial situation and prospects of getting a new employment in a reasonable time to you must factor there, as well as the reason why you might get fired.

Post # 9
Member
12 posts
Newbee

Do you qualify for severance? If so then I would stay until you are let go.  Regardless I would start looking for something else. I had a friend who knew she was going to be let go (horray publishing!) So started looking around. She was let go with a package and then started her new job shortly afterwards

Also if its downsising and not performance related I would would definitely stay.  Will be easier to spin in future interviews, shows loyalty to the company you won’t just up and leave when things get rough

Hope everything works out!!

Post # 10
Member
2704 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

tynakinnon:  

Absolutely quit! That way you may be able to not burn bridges and keep them as a reference, or you’ll be able to apply for unemployment if you need it. If you get fired, you can’t get unemployment.

I also agree with the PP, if you’re being laid off, that’s another story. It doesn’t look bad on you. In that case I would stay and look for another job in the meantime.

Post # 11
Member
2007 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

winterwoodlandbride15:  She most likely won’t qualify for unemployment benefits if she quits, either.

Post # 12
Member
2704 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

bbbria:  

Haha, that is true! Not sure what I was thinking. Yes, laid off is the best option.

Post # 13
Member
13021 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

You can’t get unemployment if you are quit (why would they pay  you for leaving a job voluntarily that was paying you) or if you are fired for something of your wrong doing.  If you are laid off along with many others are part of company resizing due to changes in the busniess, then you’d qualify, and is understandable explaination for future interviews. 

Post # 14
Member
332 posts
Helper bee

winterwoodlandbride15:  +1! As someone who used to be in HR, leaving in a noble manner (meaning, giving ample notice) is ALWAYS better from a standpoint of how it will look to a future employer. Assuming you mean you are being fired for something you did (or didn’t) do that resulted in the termination. 

This is why many employers will give a longtime or otherwise great employee an opportunity to formally resign before they actually give them the axe. That avoids the true issue that was going to get you terminated from ever formally coming to light. That can be invaluable in some careers. That also works in the employers benefit if you voluntarily resign, though, as it does typically prevent you from being eligible for unemployment in the US (despite what other bees are telling you).

From a personal standpoint (not factoring in future employment), you will be able to fight for unemployment if you are fired. If you did something pretty bad to result in your termination and your employer can prove it, you won’t likely get it, though.

If you are within your probationary period, you also won’t likely get unemployment benefits in the US if they release you. And, if you are beyond that period, that means you’ve been there more than a few months and it’s probably something you’d need to include on your resume to avoid having to explain the “lapse” in jobs. 

So, yeah… I would resign formally, in an amicable and generic manner. 

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