(Closed) Is it rude to word your response cards like this?

posted 8 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
1765 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

The first one makes more sense, and I think it’s totally fine to use this–they’re not rude, just making it clear! Just letting you know–for the second to be gramatically correct with the “accepts/declines” you’d have to have two: “accept/decline” and “accepts/declines” because obviously you are inviting one or two people. And it might be confusing to some who just check off the accept/decline if they’re supposed to put a number there instead (like one can go and one can’t).

Good luck! And remember, be polite but firm with anyone who tries to RSVP with more!!!

Post # 4
Member
1045 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2008

Just be prepared that if they ignored the inner envelopes at your cousin’s wedding, they’d probably ignore this, too.  Some people just feel like kids should come to family weddings, and they’ll write them in.  You’ll just have to be firm about responding to them and letting them know that you cannot accommodate children.  Good luck!

Post # 5
Member
166 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

First of all, I think it is SO rude of people to try to bring along dates/kids who were not invited! If an invitation is addressed to Mr. & Mrs. John Smith, it should be clear that the 5 Smith cherubs aren’t invited… I’ve never seen a response card address this issue head-on, as your cards do, and I hope it helps you get the message across to your guests. Of the two possible ways of wording, I prefer the second one. Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
545 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

I agree with cinemaparadiso , there needs to be a line for declining the inviitation. And i really think its a nice/tactful way of getting across who is/isnt invited. And honestly, i hope your family talks to one another, realizes that OTHERS kids werent invited so that they will understand you mean adults only. But def the first one is good.

Post # 8
Member
407 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

You are brave! Stay tough because I’m sure it won’t be easy!

Post # 9
Member
146 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

i like number 1………… and not rude at all

Post # 10
Member
790 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Sounds like a good way to avoid uninvited guests. I think we’ll copy you. Thanks

Post # 11
Member
173 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

In the first one, you are mentioning twice how many seats have been reserved.  That might be a bit of overkill.  I prefer the second one myself.  If you are writing in the names on the response card, however, I think that is enough.  As a prior poster said, if they will ignore the names on the inner envelope and everything else, they probably won’t let you know that they are planning on towing Jr. along.

Post # 12
Member
2186 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

i like the second one – we have the same issue with our wedding and having similar wording on our response cards so lemme know how it turns out for you!!!! 🙂

Post # 14
Member
2476 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

This is what our RSVP cards look like.  We felt the need to define the exact # of guests who we are intending to invite. 

 

[attachment=492200,65274]

Post # 16
Member
2476 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

Thanks @NeliBee!  🙂

No, we didn’t hire a calligrapher so we’re expecting our guests to just handwrite their names onto the RSVPs.  We’re hoping the combination of addressees on the envelope and the “we have reserved ____ in your honor” line (I will handwrite those #s myself) will clue them in that ONLY THESE PEOPLE ARE INVITED.  Haha!  I totally feel your pain!  I have tons of cousins who have tons of kids!  Even though I love them, I can’t possibly afford to have them all attend the wedding!  Good luck… let us know what you decide to do. 

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