(Closed) Is this a polite way to say "Stay out of the way of the photographer"?

posted 5 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
12831 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I think putting it in the program is a bit rude, but I think making an announcement right before the ceremony would be sufficient.

Post # 4
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I don’t think the way you worded it is rude at all.

Post # 5
Member
6745 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

I don’t see a problem with putting it in the program.  I think that’s a really nice way of saying – sit in your seats. Not to mention how much people pay for photographers – how rude for people to become a distraction!

Post # 6
Member
547 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

At the beginning of our ceremony, our officiant (a good friend) made a polite announcement about putting cameras and cell phones away.  He made a funny joke out of it by then looking around for the groom and having a pretend “WTF” moment.  Then he opened the chapel doors and my groom was standing there, pretending to be yakking on his cell phone.  LOL, that got a big laugh out of the guests.  Officiant then tapped groom on the shoulder to get his attention and tell him to hang up because he was about to get married!  LOL.

Post # 8
Member
547 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@mepayne:  I read someplace else (maybe a wedding advice column) on how to get guests to put cameras/cell phones away.  The officiant starts the ceremony by welcoming everyone and saying “As Shakespeare once said…please turn off your cameras and cell phones.”  LOL, for some reason that cracks me up.

Post # 10
Member
4194 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2012 - Baltimore Museum of Industry

At one friend’s wedding the couple turned after they reached the huppah, and their rabbi made an announcement asking guests to take their photos then. I thought it was a great idea- people who *really* wanted photos took them, and the rest of the ceremony was unplugged.

(We were considering doing the same for ours, but since it was outdoors, flash wasn’t going to be an issue.)

Post # 11
Member
4046 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I think people get that desperate because they really want to have pictures. Most of the time, as a guest, I attend wedings and never get to see pictures (or maybe get 1 pic in a thank you card but that’s it). Perhaps you can let your guests know that some pictures will be available later to guests, through a website or something.

Post # 12
Member
2305 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2016

@rebwana:  At my dad’s wedding this is what we did. They allowed photos of the processional, and then once we all got to the front, the officant made a statement how people had a few moments to take photos of the party, with flash or any extras they wanted, and then after, to please take all photos without flash or to put down the camera and enjoy the moment. It was good, worked great for everyone. And I got to stand and smile for a few minutes, got some good photos of the group, the bridesmaid dresses, the wedding dress, the flowers, ect. 

Post # 13
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@kerensa:  Why as a guest do you never get to see photos?  We respect our clients privacy so we don’t make their wedding gallery automatically accessible, we let them be the ones to distribute the link and the password.  Most photographers I know do online proofing, and we have certainly noticed a big drop in sales of prints over the years but attributed it more to the economy.  In the weddings you’ve attended have the couples made any effort to let the guests know when the photos were online?

Unplugged ceremonies aren’t that difficult to orchestrate.  A one sentence note to please refrain from photography in the program, a few well placed signs, and/or an announcement from the officiant should do the trick.  Trying to get your entire day unplugged would definitely be a harder accomplishment.

These threads pop up a lot.  It seems every year guests seem more gutsy in their attempts to get photos.  I just wish as the sense of entitlement grew, so too would the level of quality of the photos.  It’s one thing when a guest interferes in your photo to get one for themselves, but the worst part is their shots are always so bad.  At the very least one of us should be getting the fantastic shot…

Post # 14
Member
4046 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@continuumphotography:  From the last 10 weddings I attended, I have only seen pictures from maybe 2, that’s because we were immediate family. I have had friends get married but most people don’t share pics after the wedding. I like weddings so I would like to see more. 

I don’t think its fair to assume that all guest pictures will be terrible. Sure, some will, but many non-professionals are capable of taking decent pictures too.

Post # 15
Member
1314 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2006

@kerensa:  We’re friends with nearly all of our couples on Facebook, and what people tag them in is not pretty.  I can speak from my own experience, and we shoot 30+ a year.  Perhaps my standards are higher than most, but unflattering photos make me sad.

Post # 16
Member
2233 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@continuumphotography:  I can’t agree with you more. Most of the photos that are on facebook of us have been useless (blurry cellphone pictures)

OP, I think what you have is good but an annoucement during the ceremony is so much better. Though I can’t guarantee it will do much for you as it didn’t seem to mean a thing for us. We had guests taking photos from every angle and with an iPad even after we had our officiant make an announcement. Ridiculous. I really wish we had stopped and just looked back at everyone and said “We’ll wait while you guys put your cameras away. We’ve got time.” This is the only thing that bothered me and that I found extremely rude. 

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