(Closed) Jewish Faith for Dummies?!

posted 6 years ago in Jewish
Post # 4
Member
197 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

There is literally a Judaism for Dummies book. It’s $15 on amazon. Also, you should just ask your husband what he believes rather than try to figure out what the religion teaches. Just like Christians, there are a wide range of beliefs amongs Jewish people.

Post # 5
Member
5985 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

1. Yes, technically required multiple times a day

2. Yes but probably not the “hell or heaven” you think of.  this explains it well

3. not sure how to answer this or what you mean

I think it is great that you are wanting to know this. DH and I are not Jewish, we are Bnai Noah (Children of Noah, non-Jews). There is still tons of stuff I dont know a bout Judiasm. I am interested in reading the responses that you get. A lot of things depend on the type of Jew your DH is (reform, conservative, Orthodox, etc).

Good luck!!

 

Post # 8
Member
592 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Just like there lots of different type of Christian faiths that all believe slightly different things, the same goes for Jews.

You’re husband sounds like a cultural Jew. This is what I consider myself. I identify as Jewish although I am not religious (I was raised reformed), don’t know a lot about the religious side of things (although I did go to Hebrew Sunday school and was bat mitzvahed). I do still practice a lot of the traditions because I enjoy them and they have meaning to me since I was raised with them. We celebrate some of the holidays (my FI is not Jewish), but less since we moved away from my family. When we have kids, we plan to raise them Jewish, so we will celebrate the holidays more completely then and likely join a temple again so my kids can go to Hebrew Sunday school.

If you have any specific questions I can try to answer them. Feel free to PM me. I’m sure the questions you have aren’t dumb, as it’s hard learning a religion you weren’t raised with.

 

Post # 9
Member
592 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

P.S. His parents would likely want you to convert so that the children are Jewish. By Jewish law religion is passed through the mother, so the only way to have Jewish children is to have a Jewish mother.

Post # 10
Member
5985 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

@melisslp: I have the Judiasm for Dummies book, its pretty good but also very general. BAR/BATmitzvah = children are not obligated to live under the convenents of Moses but this ceremony formally, publicly marks the assumption of that obligation and other things.

Post # 11
Member
2788 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

@melisslp: No, a Bar/Bat Mitzvah is when one is considered an adult in the Jewish faith.  Someone is Jewish if their mother is Jewish (or father, if you are reform), or if they convert.  One does not need to pray in order to be Jewish.  I really think you should talk with you husband about the details of his faith (or lackthereof).  Besides, no one who’s Jewish would force someone else to convert, so I don’t think you need to be worried about your in-laws “forcing” you. (During the conversion process, one is discouraged a number of times by the Rabbi before proceeding, to ensure one isn’t “pressured.)

Also, just like there are many different sects of Christianity, there are also different sects of Judaism.  There isn’t just one catch-all answer to your questions.  If you are really interested in Judaism, and he’s interested in attending, I’d suggest you guys attend a Judaism 101 class together.  It would answer your questions (based on which group runs the course) and might be good for you to understand where he and his family come from.

Post # 12
Member
1482 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

According to the Reform faith, only one parent needs to be Jewish in order for your children to be considered Jewish.  Therefore, your children would be recognized as Jewish at a Reform synagogue.

I highly recommend doing some reading, if anything to understand the cultural aspects of Judaism, which are just as important as any spiritual connection to the religion. If your husband is a little rusty in his knowledge, I highly recommend taking a class together at a local synagogue if there is one available to you.  We did this when we got engaged, and even though I have not converted, I feel so lucky to have been educated on that part of my husband’s background.  There are so many beautiful things about Judaism that you will probably really enjoy, particularly since you are Catholic.  My BFF was raised Catholic but recently because interested in becoming Jewish, and she actually told me that there are a lot of similarities between Catholicism and Judaism, strange as that might sound.

Good luck!

 

 

Post # 15
Member
5985 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

The topic ‘Jewish Faith for Dummies?!’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors