Joining a Clinical Trial

posted 2 years ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
4810 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I have not, but I’ve been on the other side (I work in the pharmaceutical industry). I can say that while you are sometimes taking a risk of either an unknown drug or getting placebo, there are a lot of advantages to clinical trials. For one, you get way better care than you ever would in the real world. They also monitor safety very closely, so if the drug is starting to seem unsafe, they will stop the trial. A ton of money goes into these, so they only go to Phase 3 trials if the drug seems very promising. If you go to a screening visit, they should give you a ton of information. If you’re science/medically interested, you can ask for literature on the drug to see how it’s been used (or you can just look it up online, but only pay attention to peer-reviewed papers). You can ask as many questions as you want about how often you get the drug, possible side-effects, etc. Good luck!!

Post # 3
Member
7395 posts
Busy Beekeeper

I agree with RunnerBride13:. Whilst it can be scary to enter a trial the benefits often outweigh the negatives.

I have been in 2 trials for breats cancer drugs. One was a blind trial and I was either given the placebo or the drug didn’t work ecuase I developed cancer again. I just live in hope that the others in the trial are getting the drug that works and that my sacrifice means that a drugs gets to market sooner. My cancer was clearly destined to come back but I was willing to take the chance in the hope for a cure/better treatment.

The things I asked where about possible side effects, what the trial would cover in terms of medical care both during and after the trial and the time committment.

Post # 5
Member
55 posts
Worker bee

I have not been in a clinical trial, but I have worked on them.  There can be huge risks to clinical trials, so personally, I would consider whether there are any already approved treatments that you can try and ask yourself if the severity of your disease outweighs the risks (not just those they tell you about; there are sometimes unanticipated risks, including serious permanent side effects).  Ask your regular doctor if there is anything else he/she recommends you try first.  Ask if the trial uses a placebo.  For serious diseases, often a comparator drug is used rather than a placebo.  Though you would probably not know which you are taking, they can tell you whether a placebo is used in the trial so you know if you are risking being completely unmediated.  Ask about the success of the drug so far.  There may have been similar trials already conducted.  A drug that has been tested and approved already for other uses, for example, is less risky on the whole because the side effects have been determined.  Each trial has a different level of risk, so asking these questions can help you determine if the benefits outweigh the risks.  

Post # 7
Member
4810 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

AB Bride:  Do you know if it’s a cross-over study where they give the placebo subjects the trial drug after the trial? How long is it?

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