Knowledge of being an au pair in Spain?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
197 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

I’m confused… What exactly do you want to know? You will work out arrangements with your host family of your duties. Save your spending money for trips, stay in hostels or ask your host family to introduce you to people that you could stay with for a night. Network online to find other au pairs you can travel with. All of my friends that have been au pairs abroad seemed to make a lot of friends quickly. My ex’s cousin back packed across Europe by herself and made friends with a lot of people and even ended up moving to Australia with a guy she met! Crazy! 

My question is how will you continue to pay for your online schooling?

Post # 4
Member
197 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

ETA: any chance you can do study abroad in Spain through your current university once your current semester is over? 

Post # 6
Member
6026 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

You may want to call or visit the Spanish consulate nearest you, as they would be a great resource to help navigate your options. I would be very concerned that the room, board and pocket money could be construed as salary– really, it is, as you’re providing services in exchange for something of value. The Spanish immigration officers are pretty good at spotting people who are coming to work, and you might have some big problems if your residence is classed as work and you’re not permitted. This is the kind of question you really should not trust to an Internet forum. It’s very expensive to get deported!

You basically don’t qualify for any extended visa class that I can see, and if you can’t show financial resources to support yourself for a year, they won’t visa you for a year. You have to demonstrate that you’re not going to be a financial burden on the system if you want anything other than a tourist visa. You could just leave Spain every 90 days then return right away, with one tourist visa after another, but I think you may need to leave the EU entirely, not just nip over to France, so that gets expensive plus is the exact pattern that the immigration people are trying to find when they’re looking for undocumented workers.

Post # 8
Member
197 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

@shrubfish09:  I would look into an au pair agency that can help you. I’m not sure what visas my friends went on, but they only worked as an au pair. I also met some girls when I was in Barcelona from Sweden than worked at a call center in Spain. Maybe they got the job because they spoke Swedish, English, and were learning Spanish? 

I guess I’m not any help… Sorry!

Post # 10
Member
6026 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

@shrubfish09:  but without enrollment in a Spanish school you do not qualify for this type of visa so it’s kind of a moot point. 

Post # 11
Member
61 posts
Worker bee

Do you speak Spanish?

A couple of friends from my language teaching course went and lived in Spain for a year on working visas after graduation. They worked as private early-childhood English tutors/nannies to a few families in Madrid. So basically the same duties as an au pair, but they didn’t live with the host families and they had a different visa classification because they were both fluent in Spanish and had teaching credentials.

If you speak Spanish, you could try applying for the same thing, but you may need some kind of teaching shortcourse.

My friends also bemoaned the pace and complexity of the Spanish visa office. Apply well ahead of time and expect a long wait.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post # 12
Member
312 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

@shrubfish09:  Hon, it sounds like you’ve been through some really rough times. I hate to be the bearer of more bad news, but I’ve got to warn you that going to Spain for work is like carrying coal to Newcastle right now — unemployment is sky-high. The job market there is so horrible that there has been a MASSIVE exodus of young Spaniards to other countries in search of employment. Was just reading a NY Times article about it recently!

Anyway, I’d be really amazed if you could find a job there — and if you do, I’d be very cautious, and I would want to know exactly why your prospective employers want to hire YOU rather than a Spaniard. Make sure that their plan is not to exploit you, you know? Because they would certainly have NO trouble finding an au pair who’s already living in Spain. (And unike in some countries, plenty of Spaniards speak English, so it’s not like your language skills would make you so rare and desirable.)

Edit: Yikes, I see you were choosing between Ireland and Spain. Those two, along with Greece, are in crisis right now, and finding work is virtually impossible there even for citizens. You really might want to consider somewhere else with a more robust economy. 🙁

Post # 13
Member
5007 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

@shrubfish09:  Have you considered a different country with an easier visa process? I know you said you were set on spain, but what if you choose a country nearby with easy access? Then you can get out of your apartment, go overseas and be able to take weekend trips to Spain! That may be a good option!

Post # 14
Member
1802 posts
Buzzing bee

Maybe if you can’t figure it out you can start fresh with a different family? Look into InterExchange work abroad. I’m a nanny in the states, and am considering doing a short term nanny gig abroad, and I’ve heard wonderful things about them. They will find you a family and hopefully be able to help you out a bit more with the visa thing. You do have to pay them a fee, but it’s not like thousands or anything. There are other agencies that will do the same thing, but just make sure they’re legit and guarantee results or your money back. Other than that the only thing I can think of is staying for just under six months in Spain since that is usually how long you can stay somewhere without a visa, and then maybe moving on to another country. There are plenty of families who want to improve their English without a major committment. Also, you and the family could apply for a work visa on the basis that you are a native English speaker who is there to help them improve their English. Maybe that’ll work?

Post # 15
Member
695 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

I will throw my 2 cents in.  The following information is not my opinion it is simply what is…

I live abroad myself and I am Spanish.  I don’t however have the right citizenship to live in Spain.  But, I am an ESL teacher and familiar with your issues.  It would be a good idea to read up on some Spanish forums for expats to start with.  

That aside, something that will make your life easier is to drop out of your  university and enroll in a university in Spain instead.  This will allow you a work visa.  The other thing which people do is ‘work in the black.’  This is where you get paid under the table and you overextend your visa.  Regardless of what some may think, this is in fact what people do because the visa requirements are quite strict.  However, there will be a fee/ penality you pay when you exit the country.  The fees for this are steep, but people do it.  I’m not recommending, I’m simply stating what people do to work around the work permit issues.  

And keep in mind in order for a US citizen to legally get work in Spain a Spanish employer has to prove that no Spanish citizen or EU citizen can do the job.  Theres much paperwork the Spanish employer has to fill out and questions that must be answsered. Its quite the process. This is why people work in the black.  

The other option would be to only work for 90 days and come back to the US.  Visas in many places in the world are quite the monster to deal with.  The EU countries are protecting themselves against outsiders coming in making money.  The EU countries want to hire their own, not outsiders.  

Have you considered Chile for a nanny?  You may have to consider it because the visa requirements are more laid back there.  Also, check into the France au pair program if your under 25 years of age.  The French consulate has special placement programs for US citizens.  

Remember to move abroad and deal with all the visa issues and other crap you have to be a balls to the wall type person.  Put it all out there and be agressive with getting information from the consulates.  The consulates have the last word about visas.  Walk in with your eyes open and know there will be a mountain of paperwork.  You will have to trust your employer a great deal knowing that they will follow through on their end.  There will be fee’s involved that must be paid and deadlines that have to be met.  Lastly, talk to the right people.  It somewhat concerns me this question was posted on a wedding website.  The right people are at the consulates and the expat sites so you can talk to those who have dealt with this first hand.  You have to be very careful where you get your information from.

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